Skip navigation to main content Text version | Accessibility help Friday 24 November 2017
Medway Council Logo - Takes you to the Council home page
Search CityArk
Home | About Medway archives | Search - Explorer Query Tool | Java Query Tool | Map Search | Text Only
You are here: Medway Council > CityArk > Home > Query > Results
Your query generated 45 results (Page 1 of 2)

Result number 1 - Please quote Reference: 06a_DE_SERIES_1001_1200/DE1189 on request slip.

Path: Accessions/ 06a_DE_SERIES_1001_1200/ DE1189.html

MS items of varying provenance transferred from the Local Studies Unit, Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre, comprising:

 

Additional Hogg MSS: notebook compiled by P. Fitzgerald Hogg of 136 Palmerston Road, Chatham, antiquarian, containing list of Army officers and chaplains stationed in the Isle of Grain and vicinity during the Great War (1914-1918), arranged by regiment and giving rank, surname, initials and remarks as to movements, home addresses and whether killed or wounded in action, with some photographs and newscuttings; notes and newscuttings pertaining to Grain Martello Tower and other forts in and around the River Medway, the buildings of HM Dockyard, Chatham and the military and social history Sheerness and the Isle of Sheppey, with printed map of the Isle of Sheppey printed by W. Cole, Times Office, Sheerness. Compiled c.1914-c.1949, contents dated c.1874-c.1949 (1 volume)

[Formerly held at Chatham Library ref. KF/940; see also DE292, DE303, DE346 and DE1182]

Letter from W.S. Burton, Rosside House, Ulverston, Lancashire, a major in the Army Reserve, to his Aunt Laura, discussing the repair of a picture damaged at Windsor Castle, Berkshire, family proprietorships in Gillingham, history, land use and housing in the manor of West Court in Gillingham, the Royal Marines garrison in Chatham and mentioning members of Arnold, Dawes, Baker, Day and Downton families

15 May 1914

(2 items, paper)

[Formerly at Rochester Library ref GIL914]

 

Printed notice entitled By the Queen a Proclamation for the Encouragement of Piety and Virtue, and for the preventing and punishing of Vice, Profaneness, and Immorality

1 broadsheet

1837

 

Audio magnetic recording tape of speeches at opening of Rainham Library

29 March 1961

1 reel and box

[Formerly at Gillingham Library ref. MG433(LIB)]

 

School records of Needham family of Oldham, Lancashire and Gillingham, comprising Oldham School Board child’s school book (attendance and progress record) of Frederick Needham of 8 Roundthorn Road, Oldham, Lancashire 1879-1886 (1 booklet) and fortnightly and termly progress reports for Alfred Needham at Richmond Road Boys’ School, Gillingham 1918-1925 (1 bundle/20 items)

Date: 1874-1961
Quantity: As above
Result number 2 - Please quote Reference: 06_DE_SERIES_0751_1000/DE0852 on request slip.

Path: Accessions/ 06_DE_SERIES_0751_1000/ DE0852.html

Records of Rogers, Stevens and Chance, (formerly C.E.T. Rogers, Son and Stevens), 10 New Road, Chatham, chartered surveyors, brewery agents and valuers of licensed property, comprising:correspondence with mortgage lenders and site plans pertaining to valuation of private houses in Medway Towns and surrounding area c.1965-c.1982 (2 boxes);statements of change of tenancy of public houses, off-licences and hotels mainly in the Medway Towns (Strood, Rochester, Chatham and Brompton/Gillingham) and Kent (including Maidstone, Canterbury, Tunbridge Wells, Tenterden, Folkestone, Dover, Isle of Thanet, Sheerness and and Queenborough), but with many also covering the out-county area chiefly Sussex (including Northiam, Robertsbridge, Hastings, St. Leonards-on-Sea and Brighton) and Essex (including Bishops Stortford, Burnham-on-Crouch, Southend and Clacton-on-Sea), with a small coverage of Bedfordshire, Oxfordshire (Dorchester-on-Thames), Wiltshire (Marten), Surrey (including Godalming), Berkshire (Reading), Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Suffolk, Devon (Bear Inn, Colyton), London, Middlesex, Cambridgeshire (Cambridge), Norfolk (Spread Eagle, Barton Bendish) and Switzerland (San Domenico, Castagnola), parties (a) Rogers, Stevens and Chance acting as agents of brewers and (b) tenants, many containing valuation inventories of stock in hand and fixtures and fittings room by room, war damage correspondence and papers, dilapidations surveys, property inspection reports, monopopy valuations (stating social class of clientele), photographs and biographies of tenants, facsimile architects' drawings and site plans and correspondence with brewers, insurers and tenants, c.1871 *-c.1970. Some files contain only the firm's management correspondence on matters including petrol rationing early 1950s and use of motor vehicles c.1940 (164 boxes);finding aids to statements of change as above and correspondence files (2 1/2 boxes);brewery rating files pertaining to breweries in Kent and Norfolk, breweries comprising:
Mackeson’s Brewery, High Street, Hythe 1933-1972 (1 file);
Courage (Eastern) Building Department garages, stores and premises at 1 Buckland Road, Maidstone 1964-1967;
Fremlins Pale Ale Brewery, Stores and Offices, Earl Street, Maidstone 1950-1972;
Truman Hanbury Buxton and Co. Ltd., Bottling Stores, Surrey Street, Norwich, Norfolk 1950-1968;
Phoenix Brewery, Bow Road, Wateringbury 1923-1974 (1 file);
Cooperage and Sawmills, garages and premises, Buckland Road, Maidstone (Courage Eastern Ltd.) 1949-1974 (1 file);
Whitbread Fremlins, 43-47 Earl Street, Maidstone 1980-1983 (1 file);
Truman Ltd. Bottling Stores, 139-141 King Street, Norwich, Norfolk 1974 (1 file);
Medway Brewery, St. Peter’s Street, Maidstone, Courage (Eastern) Ltd. 1923-1977 (1 file);
The Brewery, Court Street, Faversham, Shepherd Neame Ltd. 1965-1978 (1 file);
Malt House, Nettlestead, Whitbread Fremlins Ltd. 1928-1980 (1 file);
Smaller Malt House, Nettlestead, Frederick Leney and Sons Ltd. 1928-1957 (1 file);
Off Licence 31-33 Pudding Lane, Maidstone; offices, garage, stores, workshops and premises, Pudding Lane, Maidstone, Whitbread Fremlins Ltd. 1931-1984 (1 file);
Wine and Spirit Stores, Court Street, Faversham, Whitbread Fremlins Ltd. 1963-1984 (1 file);
Brewery, Court Street, Faversham, Whitbread Fremlins Ltd. 1957-1983 (1 file);
(2 boxes);public house inventory books c.1915-c.1933, labelled George Taylor FAI, 13 and 19 Watts Place, Chatham, auctioneer and valuer, (7 1/2 boxes);letter books 1910-1932 (20 boxes);rating assessment books 1973-1974 (3 volumes);address book c.1970 (1 volume);valuation books 1967-1982 (4 binders);account books 1973-1980 (2 volumes) [* Most statements of change files post-date 1940. The only file prior to 1940 is an inventory for The Chequers public house, Higham, 1871. The surviving sequence begins at number 4591 before which the finding aid references are redundant. NB the statements of change have been weeded. 98% of files pertaining to the Medway Towns have been retained. About 40% of out area files have been destroyed as not containing inventories or other documents of social, architectural or economic value.]File updated by Borough Archivist 10 January 2004.

Not  accessible without minimum 10 working days notice: UNCATALOGUED


Date: c.1871-1984
Quantity: Pending
Result number 3 - Please quote Reference: 08_MEDWAY_COUNCIL_MTC_MR_SERIES/MTC_MR_035 on request slip.

Path: Accessions/ 08_MEDWAY_COUNCIL_MTC_MR_SERIES/ MTC_MR_035.html

Printed items from various sources: accumulated by Gillingham BC

Pembroke Road Improvement, Chatham Dockyard: Arboricultural Report, N. Fay, N. de Berker, March 1985;
Chatham Town Centre, Development Brief, Rochester upon Medway City Council 1982;
Gillingham High Street Study, July 1989;
Information Bulletin, Gillingham Borough Council Nos. 1-8, 1995;
Gillingham High Street Study, Review of Buildings, Colin Buchanan and Partners, London, 1989;
Chatham Naval Base, Unemployment Survey, Kent County Council 1983;
Chatham Maritime, Ringing out the changes & Custom built offices, 2 items, c.1987;
Gillingham Borough Council,- Marinas and Yacht Harbours: A Report, 1982;
Gillingham Borough Council: Chatham Royal Naval Base Studies 4-Development Potential, 1982;
Cleanaway Ltd., Brentwood, Essex: Environmental Statement and Supporting Statement for landfilling at Canterbury Lane, Rainham, 2 items, 1991;
Riverside Country Park, Annual Report 1992-1993, Leisure Services Department and Countryside Section, Gillingham Borough Council ;
Countryside Management Annual Report 1992-1993, Leisure Services Department and Countryside Section, Gillingham Borough Council;
Gillingham- An Archaeological and Historical Review, D. Barnes 1990;
North West Kent Enterprise Zones designated on 10 October 1986- Planning Scheme, Rochester upon Medway City Council/ Gillingham Borough Council;
A Celebration of Kent’s Architectural Heritage, Kent County Council, 1989;
Unemployment in the Medway Towns: How Serious Is It?, Medway Towns Christian Council, 1986;
SERPLAN- Increasing Activity in the Eastern Thames Corridor, 1988;
SERPLAN- Action in the East Thames Corridor, 1990;
Gillingham Town Centre Plan, Gillingham Borough Council, 1980;
Gillingham Town Centre: Into the Eighties- Topics for Public Discussion, Gillingham Borough Council, 1979;
English Estates/ Gillingham Borough Council: Chatham Ship Repair and Ship-building Study, Final Report, 1985;
Gillingham Business Park, North West Kent Enterprise Zone, No.5, Planning Scheme, Gillingham Borough Council, 1983;
13 booklets on the Channel Tunnel Rail Link, produced by Kent County Council, SERPLAN, Environmental Resources Ltd., Transmark (Talis), Pieda PLC of Reading, Berkshire and Coopers Lybrand Deloitte/British Railways Board, 1991;
Register of Unused and Underused Land in the Borough of Gillingham, Gillingham Borough Council, 1992;
Kent Development Plan, Medway Towns, 1967 Revision (1 large rolled map); Medway Towns Town Map (1970 Revision), Report on the Survey and Analysis, Kent County Council, 1970;
Medway Towns Local Plan, draft community services and utilities topic report, 1987;Call number: GBCFile updated by Borough Archivist 17 November 2005.


Date: 1967-1995
Quantity: 26 items
Result number 4 - Please quote Reference: 08_MEDWAY_COUNCIL_MTC_MR_SERIES/MTC_MR_041 on request slip.

Path: Accessions/ 08_MEDWAY_COUNCIL_MTC_MR_SERIES/ MTC_MR_041.html

Items of varied provenenance from within Gillingham Borough Council and its predecessor authorities,

including: Hand-drawn map of Brompton by Commanding Royal Engineer, showing Black Lion Field, RE officers’ cricket ground, Great Lines, King’s Bastion, Prince Edward’s Bastion, Prince Henry’s Bastion, public footpaths and proposed cricket and recreation ground for the inhabitants of Old and New Brompton, originally accompanying a letter to the High Constable of Gillingham (not present), 1867 [mutilated];
Spiral-bound “Deposited Map” of North West Kent Enterprise Zones (Designation) Order 1986 with covering letter from Tony Steele, Department of the Environment and Transport, London W14 1986 to G.C. Jones, Chief Executive, 1 roll;
Minutes of Council and Reports of Committees January – September 1962, 1 binder;
Signed minutes of Civil Defence Sub-Committee with reports 1949-1953, 1 file;
Minutes and agenda papers, Medway Civil Defence Committee 1955-1959, 1 file;
Minutes, Medway Civil Defence Committee 1953-1960, 1 file;
Minutes and agenda papers, Medway Civil Defence Committee, with lists of attendees 1952-1955, 1 file;
Minutes and agenda papers, Medway Civil Defence Committee 1959-1963, 1 file;
Printed Civil Defence booklets:
Pocket Book No.4: Warden Section 1961;
Pocket Book No.5: Rescue Section 1961
Volume I pamphlet No.1: Nuclear Weapons 1956;
Pamphlet No.6, Atomic Warfare Manual of Basic Training, volume II 1950;
Files of training course circulars, Civil Defence Staff College, Sunningdale Park, Sunninghill, Berkshire, Home Office Civil Defence School, The Hawkhills, Easingwold, Yorkshire and Home Office HQ, South Eastern Region, Tunbridge Wells 1952-1962, 5 files, named to Frank Hill;
Kent and Medway Sub-Division air raid shelter, exercise and finance files, including maps 1950s-1960s, 8 files;
Small scale maps of Borough area showing air raid sirens 1951, c.1951;
Diplomas or Certificates to Harry T. Wookey Royal Society from the Prevention of Accidents 1956 (1) and Kent Division of the Civil Defence Corps 1956 (2);
Civil Defence Syllabus for Local Training No.6: Welfare Section;
Gillingham Borough Council municipal year books, lists of departmental staffs 1962,
Postage book 1964-1985;
Legal Section Petty Cash book 1965-1973;
Hackney Carriage Licences 1965-1967, 2 files;
Newspapers and news-cuttings reporting opening of new (i.e. central) Rochester road bridge by Princess Margaret (15 April 1970), 17 April 1970, 1 bundle;
Cutting from Chatham, Rochester and Gillingham Observer 16 November 1912, reporting dispute over Alderman G.C. Swain, Mayor’s salary;
Paper tissue cover of Incorporation programme, 1903 with associated correspondence
Printed pamphlet, Mayor of Gillingham’s Annual Ball, Sunday 4th December 1993;
Printed pamphlet entitled: Houses for the Aged Charity, Gillingham, Kent, after 1937;
Printed items comprising Port of London and Medway Conservancy and Chatham Sun Pier Acts and associated river and harbour instruments, etc., 1857-1951 with section and plan of Chatham Sewers stormwater outfall to River Medway, W.H. Radford & Son, Nottingham, Chartered Civil Engineers 1927 and stencil TS proceedings of 1st. and 2nd. Days of Public Local Inquiry, River Medway Catchment Area (Re-Organisation Scheme) (Land Drainage Act 1930), 1933;1 bundle
Seal Registers 1971-1992, 10 volumes;
Register of Guarantees to Building Societies 1954-1960;
Roll of Honorary Freemen 1953-1998 (Corps of Royal Engineers 1953, HMS Pembroke 1955, Frederick Frank Arthur Burden 1971, Ronald William Jones 1992 and Philip Frederick Cooper 1998), also containing hand-drawn Coat of Arms

ISAD(G)/collection ref: GBC (uncat)  Notice required

 


Date: 1857-1998
Quantity: several boxes
Result number 5 - Please quote Reference: 08_MEDWAY_COUNCIL_MTC_MR_SERIES/MTC_MR_083 on request slip.

Path: Accessions/ 08_MEDWAY_COUNCIL_MTC_MR_SERIES/ MTC_MR_083.html

Economic Development and Neighbourhood Renewal Division, Economic Development Department, Medway Council, Municipal Buildings, Canterbury Street, Gillingham.

Printed, spiral-bound booklet entitled Rochester Airfield review project: assessment of land use options, report on public consultation W.S. Atkins Consultants Ltd., Berkshire House, 168-173 High Holborn, London WC1 for Medway Council.

ISAD (G) reference/call no.: MTC/DE/EDNR/1

File updated by Borough Archivist 26 January 2008


Date: March 2001
Quantity: 1 volume
Result number 6 - Please quote Reference: 08_MEDWAY_COUNCIL_MTC_MR_SERIES/MTC_MR_123 on request slip.

Path: Accessions/ 08_MEDWAY_COUNCIL_MTC_MR_SERIES/ MTC_MR_123.html

Records transferred by , Asset and Property Management Section, Financial Planning and Asset Management Division, Finance and Corporate Services Directorate, Medway Council, comprising additional records of Gillingham Borough Council, recovered from  Limehouse Wharf, Rochester, all files except where stated otherwise.Original file references quoted where given.Development Services DepartmentMilitary [and Naval] Marches 1993-1997 (M3);
Military Marches: Victory in Europe (VE) Day, Freedom March 1997 (M3);
Visit of SS Jeremiah O’Brien, US liberty ship, HMS Alderney and Kruzenstern, VE Day 1995, 1994-1995 (U2);
Chatham Dockyard and Chatham Maritime Development 1990-1993 (D2);
St. Mary’s Island, Chatham Maritime 1996-1997 (D2);
Chatham Dockyard and Chatham Maritime Development 1987-1994 (D4);
Chatham Dock Co. Ltd. 1988-1990 (D4);
Recycling: General 1994-1997 (R8);
Revised Business Plan 1996-1998, c.1997 (1 booklet);
Corporate Communications Strategy 1996 (C22);
Computer Systems 1993-1998 (C8);
Corporate filing schedule or index 1997 (1 sheaf);
1991 Census 1993-1996 (C17);
Groundwork Medway Swale 1993-1997 (G7);
Cycling 1991-1994 (C12);
Parking – Gillingham 1994 (P1);
Parking Control 1996-1997 (P4);
Road Markings: Disabled 1994 (R2/2);
Designing Out Crime Working Party 1993-1996 (D8);
Rainham High Street Development 1987-1996 (D2);
Riverside Country Park 1996-1998 (R10);
Strand Car Park 1989-1990;
Strand: Medway Cruising Club 1993 (72/6);
Romania 1994 (R9);
Channel Tunnel Rail Link and Union Railways 1993-1995 (B3/1);
Printed booklet entitled The Medway Tunnel published by Kent County Council 1996 (1 booklet);Technical Services DepartmentInformation Technology Advisory Panel 1994-1997 (I4);
Information Technology (IT) 1994-1996 (C13);
Internet 1996 (I6);
Information Services Policy Board 1993-1997 (1 ring binder);
Cycling [1995] 1996-1998 (C12);
Cycling 1994-1996 (C12);
Victory over Japan (VJ) Day and HMS Chatham 1995-1996 (M3/2);
Military Authorities 1987-1995 (M3);
Cable Television (TV) 1994-1996 (C9);
Market, Gillingham 1987-1994 (M1);
A2/Otterham Quay Lane, Rainham, Boot Fair, with photographs 1994;
Boot Fairs 1994-1995 (B12);
Correspondence with councillors 1997-1998 (C11);
Tourist Information Centre, Farthing Corner 1994-1995 (T3);
Farthing Corner 1994-1997 (F2);
Complaints: Grumble Sheets 1994-1997 (C20);
Copies of and memoranda about contributions to Boroughwide 1994-1997 (B1);
Gillingham Football Club [1987] 1993-1997 (GI);
Direct Labour Organisation (DLO) 1987-1997 (D3);
Gillingham Town Centre Initiative Revitalisation Strategy and Action Plan 1995 (1 booklet);
Gillingham District Centre Initiative Single Regeneration Budget Revitalisation Strategy 1994 (1 booklet);
Gillingham High Street Study: Analysis and Layout Options 1989 (1 booklet);
Gillingham Town Centre Plan 1980 (1 booklet);
Gillingham High Street Study volumes 1-2 by Colin Buchanan and Partners 1989 (2 booklets);
Gillingham High Street Study: Analysis and Layout Options by Colin Buchanan and Partners 1989 (1 booklet);
Gillingham Town Centre: Into the Eighties [cf.1980s] – Topics for Public Discussion 1979 (1 booklet);
Tender documents, Gillcrest, for Parkwood Shopping Precinct 1991 (E0110);
Investors in People 1996-1997 (S3);
Neighbourhood Watch 1991-1998 (N2);
Medway Towns Northern Relief Road and Medway Tunnel drawings 1986-1990 (1 bundle);
Chatham Historic Dockyard 1987-1994 (D4);
Chatham Maritime 1994-1996 (C7)Borough Engineer’s DepartmentContract books 1948-1951 and 1948-1952 (2 volumes);
Report upon the Main Drainage of the Borough by J.K. Urwin MICE, MIMunE, Borough Engineer 1958 (1 booklet);
Hydraulic Aspects of the Design of a Proposed Stormwater Overflow at Gillingham by Hydraulics Research Station, Wallingford, Berkshire 1964 (1 booklet with MS notes enclosed);
General Purposes Committee, Mayoral and Civic Matters including County Cricket 1984-1994 (10/1);Kent County Council, Highway Management Unit, Municipal Buildings, Canterbury Street, GillinghamGillingham Football Club, with photographs 1997
Opening of Aylesford New Bridge 1997
A228 Sharnal Street Bypass Completion Ceremony 1996, 1995-1996
Repairs to A229 Maidstone Spine Road river wall [cf. River Medway], Fairmeadow, Maidstone; A2 [cf. Watling Street] Brewers Gate Site Investigation; Railway Street Viaduct, Chatham; 1983-1998
Kent County Council (The Borough of Gillingham) (Consolidation of Waiting Restrictions) Order 1972 (Amendment No.46) Order 1996 (1 booklet)Call no./ISAD (G) reference: GBC additional.

Standard 30 year closure will apply to most files.

Date: 1948-1998
Quantity: 10 boxes
Result number 7 - Please quote Reference: CH108_Hospital_of_Sir_John_Hawkins_Kt_in_Chatham_1500_1984/CH108_055 on request slip.

Path: Charities_and_Poor_Relief_Organisations_1500_1987/ CH108_Hospital_of_Sir_John_Hawkins_Kt_in_Chatham_1500_1984/ 01_Constitution_and_Pensioners_1594_1982/ 04_Deputy_Governors_Business_and_Appointments_1609_1982/ Correspondence_1830_1982/ CH108_055.html

Hospital of Sir John Hawkins Knight in Chatham

File, correspondence relating to administration, government and finance of the Hospital, as CH108/53 above

Containing correspondence with National Association of Almshouses, Wokingham, Berkshire, Charity Commission, London SW1, Watts' Almshouses, Maidstone Road, Rochester largely concerning finances and constitution of Hospital and with Michell & Partners, London SW15, Charted Architects, concerning restoration and structural work.

Includes letter listing background of residents 29 February 1980.

Includes facsimiles of Hospital site plan as CH108/54.
Date: January-July 1980
Quantity: 1 file/c.75pp


Result number 8 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_AZc_8_2 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB01_Administrative_Records_1541_1968/ 37_DRc_AZc_Miscellaneous_Correspondence_1566_to_c1717/ DRc_AZc_8_2.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester: Miscellaneous correspondence
Letter.Samuel Prat [cf. Pratt], Dean of Rochester, Windsor, Berkshire: Agreement to all the Chapter may do in his absence. Mentions a copy of Du Piu available for six pounds. Requests he remit money to his sister [Lydia] Poole. Asks Mr. Spaine [cf. Spain, Spayne, Spaigne] [organist] to send him a list of the complete services of Dr. Child/Childs in Desolre sharp or Dr. Blow.

Date: 8 December 1717
Quantity: 1p.
Result number 9 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_Ele_103_1 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB02_Estate_Records_1346_1963/ 04_DRc_Ele_Leases_1346_to_1896/ DRc_Ele_103_1.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester.

Leases

HOO ST. WERBURGH AND HIGH HALSTOW, WICKHAMBREAUX AND STODMARSH

Ele103 2 messuages or farms in Hoo and High Halstow; a farmhouse in Wickhambreaux; and the rents and profits from a farm in Stodmarsh. [See DRc/Ele 981.] *

Agreement

A, B

Thomas Forster of the Inner Temple, London, esq. and Michael Payne of Wallingford, Berkshire, gentleman; James Thomson of Wallingford, Berkshire, gentleman, son and heir of James Thomson, gentleman, deceased, son and heir apparent while he lived of Robert Thomson, late of Wallingford Berkshire, deceased; Sir Thomas Aston of Aston [by Sutton], Chester, [Cheshire] bart. and John Aston of Aston, Chester, gentleman, his brother.

Agreement that during the remainder of the term of 70 years which began in 1616 on the death of Robert Thomson, James Thomson and Elizabeth, his wife shall have the rents and profits from the 2 messuages or farms in Hoo St. Werburgh and Halstow; from the farmhouse in Wickhambreaux during the lives of Katherine Evington and Jane Hide; and from a farm in Stodmarsh after their deaths.

* It is possible that these deeds are connected in some way with those listed under DRc/Ele 98 but no real link has been established.

Date: 30 May 1636
Quantity: 2 items
Result number 10 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_Ele_103_2 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB02_Estate_Records_1346_1963/ 04_DRc_Ele_Leases_1346_to_1896/ DRc_Ele_103_2.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester.

Leases

2 messuages or farms in Hoo St. Werburgh and High Halstow.

Bargain and sale

James Thomson of Wallingford, Berkshire, esq. to Henry Pannell of Sittingbourne, yeoman.

Date: 20 April 1637
Quantity: 1 item
Result number 11 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_Ele_103_4 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB02_Estate_Records_1346_1963/ 04_DRc_Ele_Leases_1346_to_1896/ DRc_Ele_103_4.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester.

Leases

2 messuages or farms in Hoo St. Werburgh and High Halstow.

Release

James Thomson of Wallingford, Berkshire, esq., Thomas Forster of the inner Temple, London, esq., Michael Payne of Wallingford, Berkshire, esq., Sir Thomas Aston of Aston, Chester, bart., and John Aston of Aston, Chester, gentleman, his brother to Henry Pannell of Sittingbourne, yeoman.

Date: 26 June 1637
Quantity: 1 item
Result number 12 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_Ele_235_02 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB02_Estate_Records_1346_1963/ 05_DRc_Ele_Leases_1346_to_1896/ DRc_Ele_235_02.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester

Leases

ESTATE

Out-County Estate Leases and Related Documents

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE: CUDDINGTON

Messuage called Hilles house in Cuddington; 5 acres inclosed land, once part of Slowe furlong and Bellam Bults; 6 acres inclosed land, once part of Mill furlong lying west of Bridgway; and 6 acres inclosed land, once part of Peas furlong lying west of Bridgeway there.

Feoffment with livery of seisin

Richard Stratton of Haddenham, yeoman, Andrew Bartlett of New Windsor, Berkshire, butcher and William Smyth [cf. Smith] of Waddesden, Buckinghamshire, blacksmith to Charles Very [cf. Vere, Vearie] of Cuddington, yeoman

Date: 1 May 1641
Quantity: 1 item
Result number 13 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_Ele_235_03 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB02_Estate_Records_1346_1963/ 05_DRc_Ele_Leases_1346_to_1896/ DRc_Ele_235_03.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester

Leases

ESTATE

Out-County Estate Leases and Related Documents

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE: CUDDINGTON

Messuage called Hilles house in Cuddington; 5 acres inclosed land, once part of Slowe furlong and Bellam Bults; 6 acres inclosed land, once part of Mill furlong lying west of Bridgway; and 6 acres inclosed land, once part of Peas furlong lying west of Bridgeway there.

A, B

Mortgage to secure £208

Richard Stratton of Haddenham, yeoman, Andrew Bartlett of New Windsor, Berkshire, butcher and William Smyth of Waddesden, Buckinghamshire, blacksmith to Charley Very of Cuddington, yeoman

Date: 5 July 1641
Quantity: 2 items
Result number 14 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_EIf_00_Intro on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB02_Estate_Records_1346_1963/ 10_DRc_EIf_Cathedral_inventories_c1670_to_1870/ DRc_EIf_00_Intro.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester

Estate records

Cathedral Inventories (DRc/Elf 1-10)

These inventories cover a very short period, only c.1670-c.1743, barely a hundred years (with the exception of one item compiled in 1870) and there is nothing to suggest that any were taken after c.1743. The date of each inventory more or less coincides with the appointment of a new Dean: John Castillion in 1676; Simon Louth or Henry Ullock in 1688 or 1689; Samuel Pratt in 1706; Nicholas Claggett in 1723; Thomas Herring in 1731 and William Barnard in 1743. The inventories were made by the Treasurer and are of considerable interest: firstly in providing detail about the furnishing of the cathedral, about its books and possessions, its music and its plate, and secondly, albeit incidentally, in providing detail about the storage of documents in the Chapter Room or Chapter House as it was then called.

The earliest inventory is merely a list of plate, ornaments and utensils. It is undated but was probably the first such inventory taken. As such it represents the cathedral as it was furnished in the immediate post-restoration period. There were blue damask cushions and hangings with blue and gold fringes for the prebendaries' stalls; and purple beige cushions for the mayor and common councilmen's stalls; there were tapestries behind the high alter; purple hangings with purple and gold fringes and a blue satin cushion with a purple and gold fringe for the pulpit; and purple beige covers on all the seats under the cushions. The bible and common prayer book on the high altar were covered in red velvet. The blue damask was still in use in 1707 but by 1725 had been replaced with purple baize.

Dr. Clarke's inventory of about 1678 is a much more detailed document. Apart from everything in the first inventory which is comprised under the heading in the quire, it lists the furnishings for the high altar, the bishops throne and the stalls and gives a special inventory of the furnishings and goods in the Chapter Room. These include the portraits of King James I and King Charles II, also mentioned in the first inventory, and the great presses and chest in which the books and documents were kept. The library was kept in a great press with three locks. The Chapter leases were apparently bundled up in alphabetical order of parish and stored, probably flat, one bundle on top of another in a chest. The counterparts were bundled up in a similar way and stored in boxes in the chest together with the treasurersí and receiversí books, the survey books and the dotation charters.

The most interesting thing, though, about this inventory is that it lists books and documents of all sorts, many of which still survive, some for the priory and some for the cathedral. These include accounts for the bailiffs and collectors, 1605; account roll of William Fresswell, Prior of Rochester, 1514, letters of Princes, noblemen and others to the Dean and Chapter of Rochester; abstract of counterpart leases for the period King Edward III - Elizabeth I Primum Registrum; Tertium Registrum; register of Priors William Wood and Thomas Bourne; a composition relating to tithes and pensions, 1421; a register of leases begun in 1673; a parchment bag of small ancient writings; and old counterparts of leases, charters, grants, patents and papers. Sergeant Barrell is noted as having three registers of Martin Cotes and Mr. Somers in parchment in his possession, as well as a register in leather, the donation in a box, and the statute book.

The third inventory of 1689 mentions a new set of singing books with leather covers and the acquisition of another large chest placed near the portal in the Chapter Room in which were kept old writings of lands, tenements and hereditaments and the treasurers' and receivers' books for 1677-1682. It adds also the new exemplification of the dotation charter acquired in 1671, the statute book, the seven books in the school which included four books of the Whole Duty of Man in latin, and the Cromwellian (1) buff coats and arms left in the cathedral. This inventory is updated to 1695 and notes the acquisition of a new great bible in 1693 and a gift of silk brocade from the bishop at his visitation in 1695. A second copy annotated by David Hill, Treasurer, to 1701 adds the pre-Restoration plate bequeathed to the cathedral by Sir Joseph Williamson in that year.

[(1) These Rochester Cathedral Precincts militia uniforms are now held by the Guildhall Museum, High Street, Rochester.]

The inventory actually taken in 1701 mentions two new books of Common Prayer for the high altar given by Dean Henry Ullock in 1700; a set of service books and anthems for the boys and a set of Mr. Tomkins' books (2). In 1707 there were also six folio singing books called Birds (3) and a gilt service and anthem book for the Dean's use (4). There were two more chests in the Chapter Room by this date, one containing writings and the other full of old surrendered deeds. All the chests are said to have drawers. The Textus Roffensis (DRc/R1) is mentioned for the first time in 1707 as being stored with the Parliament surveys and the leases.

[(2) Either Giles Tomkins, 1568-1668 [?] or his brother John Tomkins, 1586-1638. Both were organists at Kings' College Chapel, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire. Giles Tomkins was household musician to King Charles I. See Dictionary of National Biography, Local Studies Collection]

[(3) William Byrd, 1538-1623. See Dictionary of National Biography, Local Studies Collection]

[(4) The anthem book had disappeared by 1725.]

By 1725 a new standing brass eagle desk fashioned with baskets had been acquired together with a new bible printed on best paper in 1717. This inventory mentions that most of the singing an service books were worn out: the Tomkins set was still in existence but not the Birds, but there were at this date parts for counter tenor, tenor, base and treble for the first time. In the Chapter Room there were now two presses for books whereof a New Catalogue is now Order'd to be made and a new press for hoods and surplices. The inventory also notes that the Custumale is stored with the Textus Roffensis (DRc/R1) together with the new copy of the statutes (5). There is no further mention of the school books after 1707.

[(5) The copy made by Joseph Bowles, Bodley's Librarian, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, from the original in the library there by order of Bishop Francis Atterbury, and given to the Dean and Chapter by the Bishop before he fled to France. See DRc/As 3 and note.]

A corrected version of this inventory states that the quarter clock in the organ loft had been removed to the belfry and that the new library catalogue had been finished. A new version of the King's arms is mentioned as well as a map of land and houses lying within the fortification lines of Chatham Dock [i.e. Chatham Dockyard]; and some glass lamps for the Dean's yard and the Precincts.

In 1732 the choir was using Dr. Croft's Musica Sacra (6) and there is the first mention of two writing desks in the Chapter Room, one for the Chapter Clerk and one for the Treasurer and Receiver. According to the 174[3] [i.e. 1743] inventory, these were both lockable and the latter was in two portions with two locks. In the additions to the 1732 inventory is mentioned the acquisition of an armchair and twelve other chairs of Russia leather in 1736, three new lamps, Burnett in two volumes (7), Cayley's catalogue of the Cotton Library and a large map of the Haddenham, Buckinghamshire, Estate.

[(6) William Croft, 1677-1727, organist at the Chapel Royal, Windsor, Berkshire 1707, and at Westminster Abbey, Middlesex, 1708. See Dictionary of National Biography, Local Studies Collection.]

[(7) Gilbert Burnett, Bishop of Salisbury, Wiltshire, 1643-1715. This is a reference to his History of the Reformation published in three volumes in 1679, 1681 and 1714. See Dictionary of National Biography, Local Studies Collection.]

The final inventory of about 1743 mentions seven copies of Dr. Green's music books (8) as well as two Dr. Crofts [see above] and indicates the partial reorganisation of the Chapter Room. It states that there were, under one of the two library presses, three places with locks in which were kept the Chapter Books, registers, statute books and other useful writings. Presumably the old chests had been cleared out. And yet there was still another new chest for writings in the outward room.

[(8) Presumably Maurice Greene or Green of London, composer of cathedral music 1696-1755 (see New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians editor S. Sadie, 2001 or possibly James Green, fl. 1743, organist at Hull, East Riding, Yorkshire, author of A book of Psalmody, 1724 See Dictionary of National Biography, Local Studies Collection.]

All the inventories except the first two are in roll form. It would appear from those which survive that the usual practice was either to make a paper draft on the spot and then to draw up two identical fair copies as an indenture (but without any indented top), or else to take one of the copies of the previous occasion's inventory and to annotate it for the drawing up of the next inventory. This list has been compiled with this in mind.

There are also two inventories of the Deanery 1737 and 1743, and a cathedral library shelf list dated 1871.

File updated by Borough Archivist, Medway Council 9 January 2003.

Date: N/A
Quantity: N/A
Result number 15 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTb_045 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 01_DRc_FTb_Treasurers_books_1548_to_1913/ DRc_FTb_045.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester   Finance records: Treasurers' books (DRc/FTb )

 

 

Giving lists of names and signatures of recipients arranged under headings as per cathedral officers, canons, prebends, choristers, paupers [beadsmen?] and pupils of the Cathedral Grammar School.

 

Treasurer's book - Edmund Barrell

 

Includes expenses: received of the treasurer twenty shillings for going to London to make an affidavit in order to procure an injunction against cutting down the church timber in Cobham Park, by me Henry Turner, 12 March 1711

 

Includes expenses: received for the ringers for 3 ringing days, viz. Her Majesty's coronation day, the 29th. of May and for the taking of Bouchain [cf. Artois, Flanders, Pas-de-Calais, France], twenty shillings, Stephen Huggins, 3 October 1711

 

Includes 2s 6d alms given to one John Constantine, a poor scholar, 26 February 1711

 

Includes 1s alms given to the box of the poor debtors in Southwark [London, Surrey], 15 April 1711

 

Includes 7s 6d alms given to Elizabeth Harman, daughter to a poor knight of Windsor [Berkshire], 28 May 1711

 

Includes 10s alms given to Mrs. Fletcher, wife of Dr. Fletcher, taken by the French, and carried prisoner into France, 8 July 1711

 

Includes 6d alms given to 2 poor women from Barbados [West Indies], 13 September 1711

 

Includes 6d alms given to 2 poor seamen that had been taken by a French [cf. France] privateer, and set on shore at Dartmouth [Devon], 28 October 1711

 

Includes 5s alms given to Mrs. Ogleby a Scotch [cf. Scotland] clergyman's widow in distress, 21 November 1711

 

Includes 5s alms given to Mr. Henry Waring (a gentleman in a very low condition) going over into Holland [cf. Netherlands] to seek for a subsistence for himself and his son, 26 November 1711

 

Includes alms given to disbanded, discharged, sick, lame and poor seamen and soldiers, passim

 

Latin and English.

Date: 1710-1711
Quantity: 1 volume/72pp. used
Result number 16 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTb_053 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 01_DRc_FTb_Treasurers_books_1548_to_1913/ DRc_FTb_053.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester

Finance records: treasurer

Treasurers' books 1548-1913 (DRc/FTb 1-243)

Each book is as a general rule divided up as follows: salaries paid to the Dean, prebendaries, minor canons, lay readers, choirmaster, organist, choristers, King's scholars, officers, stewards, counsellor, bailiff, and other church officers; the royal subsidy and annuity; pensions to the clergy; episcopal fees (exenia); alms; reparations to the fabric of the cathedral; exhibitions for King's scholars; expenses at law: extraordinary expenses and highway repair; necessaries; wood for fuel; carriage; and other items.

Giving lists of names and signatures of recipients arranged under headings as per cathedral officers, canons, prebends, choristers, paupers [beadsmen?] and pupils of the Cathedral Grammar School.

Treasurer's book - John Harris.

Includes 1s alms given to Richard Reading, William Parsons, and Thomas Goddard, 3 poor disbanded soldiers from Ireland, 6 December 1718

Includes 6d alms given to Thomas Laflieur, a poor Frenchman [cf. France] with a pass from Greenwich, 13 December 1718

Includes 6d alms given to one Christian Shirk, a Swiss [cf. Switzerland] soldier, with a pass from London, 4 February 1719

Includes alms given to George Oliver and William Smith, poor soldiers from Port Mahon [Minorca; cf. Spain, Balearic Islands], January 1719

Includes 6d alms given to John Powel [cf. Powell] with a pass from London to Boston in [Massachusetts] New England, 17 February 1719

Includes 1s alms given to Eleanor Gray [cf. Grey], a poor woman of the parish of Stepney [London] with a petition, 17 April 1719

Includes 2s 6d alms given to Mr. Thomas Sleamar, vicar of Chaddleworth in the county of Berkshire, 2 May 1719

Includes 2s 6d alms given to two poor women with six children from Friesland (Friezland) [cf. Holland/Netherlands; Germany], 30 May 1719

Includes 2s 6d alms given to James Smith, with his wife, and family with a pass from Weymouth in the county of Dorset to pass to Boston in [Massachusetts] New England [cf. America], the place of his nativity, 1 June 1719

Includes 1s 6d alms given to John Reynolds with a wife and 2 small children, in a poor distressed condition, with a pass for Jamaica [West Indies, Caribbean], 22 June 1719

Includes 2s 6d alms given to Thomas Foote, son of Mr. John Foote, late rector of West Grimstead (West Grimsteed) in Wiltshire, 6 August 1719

Includes 6d alms given to some poor hoppers, 6 August 1719

Includes 6d alms given to Martha Drew, a soldier's wife, with a pass from the Honourable George Treby [cf. Tribe] Esq. to pass to Minorca [cf. Balearic Islands, Spain], to her husband, 18 August 1719

Includes 6d alms given to Redmund Moguier, a discharged soldier with a pass from Dover, 2 September 1719

Includes 6d alms given to a poor silk weaver in great want, 12 September 1719

Includes 6d alms given to Robert Haberden, and William Harvey, shipwrecked in coming from the island of Barbados (Barbadoes) [West Indies, Caribbean], 15 September 1719

Includes 2s alms given to George Steward [cf. Stewart, Stuart], a poor discharged soldier, with a wife, and child that had the smallpox upon him, 25 September 1719

Includes 6d alms given to John Williams a poor lame fellow with a wooden leg, 6 November 1719

Includes 1s alms given to John Wilson and John Jones, petitioners on account of some losses they had sustained by an inundation of waters in Lincolnshire, 12 November 1719

Includes 2s alms given to John Dupont a Hollander [cf. Holland/Netherlands] and nine others; with a pass from Waterford in Ireland, cast away in their passage thither, 24 November 1719

Includes alms given to numerous discharged, disbanded, sick, lame and poor soldiers and seamen, passim

Latin and English.

File updated by Borough Archivist, Borough Council 16 July 2001.

Date: 1718-1719
Quantity: 1 booklet/63pp. used
Result number 17 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTb_057 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 01_DRc_FTb_Treasurers_books_1548_to_1913/ DRc_FTb_057.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester

Finance records: treasurer

Treasurers' books 1548-1913 (DRc/FTb 1-243)

Each book is as a general rule divided up as follows: salaries paid to the Dean, prebendaries, minor canons, lay readers, choirmaster, organist, choristers, King's scholars, officers, stewards, counsellor, bailiff, and other church officers; the royal subsidy and annuity; pensions to the clergy; episcopal fees (exenia); alms; reparations to the fabric of the cathedral; exhibitions for King's scholars; expenses at law: extraordinary expenses and highway repair; necessaries; wood for fuel; carriage; and other items.

Giving lists of names and signatures of recipients arranged under headings as per cathedral officers, canons, prebends, choristers, paupers [beadsmen?] and pupils of the Cathedral Grammar School.

Treasurer's book - Daniel Hill.

Includes expenses: £1 paid myself for preaching on that [sic] being the thanksgiving day appointed by His Majesty for giving almighty God thanks for his preserving us from that dreadful plague wherewith the kingdom of France had been lately visited, 25 April 1723

Includes expenses incurred in restoring the cathedral (p.43) and rebuilding Minor Canon Row, Rochester (pp.45-50)

Includes 6d alms given to John Frederick an Hamburger (Hamburgher) [cf. Schleswig Holstein, Germany] that had been taken by the Sally [cf. Algiers, Algeria, Africa] Rovers [cf. pirates, Algerines, corsairs], 12 December 1722

Includes 5s alms given to Dr. Harris's son, Charles Harris, who showed me a certificate of his good behaviour at sea, under his captain's hand, Captain Vanbrugh, 5 January 1723

Includes 6d alms given to Hugh Molyneaux (Mullenaux), a poor soldier from Dublin [Ireland], 26 January 1723

Includes 2s 6d alms given to Roger Coveney of Rainham in a very poor condition with a petition signed by Thomas Cradock [cf. Craddock], vicar of Rainham, 7 March 1723

Includes 1s alms given to a poor Turkish [cf. Turkey] slave, that had his tongue cut out, 10 March 1723

Includes 10s alms given to Dr. Harris's son, when Captain John Trevors entertained him aboard his ship, as his servant, 13 March 1723

Includes 2s alms given to Catherine West, a merchant's widow at Athlone in Ireland a great sufferer by fire, with a petition setting forth her loss, 27 March 1723

Includes 1s 6d alms given to William Stewart, a native of Boston [Massachusetts, New England, America], who had been taken by the Sally [cf. Algiers, Algeria, Africa, Barbary] Rovers [cf. pirates, Algerines, corsairs], 29 May 1723

Includes 2s 6d alms given to Elizabeth Leaming of Laugharne (Lagharne) in the county of Carmarthen [cf. Carmarthenshire, Wales], a poor widow in great distress, with a petition under the hand of the mayor of Windsor [Berkshire], Richard Reeve, in behalf of herself and 5 small children, 15 June 1723

Includes 1s 6d alms given to Hashe Batisto, Peter Levato etc. that had been taken by the Sally-Rovers [cf. Algerine Corsairs, pirates] and carried into Sally [cf. Algiers, Algeria, Africa, Barbary], 20 June 1723

Includes to one Thomas de Plainis and Dominic Ginochium who had been taken by the Turks [cf. Turkey]; each 6d a piece, 23 August 1723

Includes 6d alms given to one Peter Franklin, forced to abscond upon account of suretyship, 16 September 1723

Includes 6d alms given to a poor Walloon [cf. Wallonia; France; Belgium: Hainault, Namur, Liege, Luxemburg/Luxembourg], 7 November 1723

Includes alms given to numerous discharged, disbanded, maimed, sick, poor and shipwrecked soldiers, seamen and other persons, passim

Latin and English.

Date: 1722-1723
Quantity: 1 booklet/67pp. used
Result number 18 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTb_062 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 01_DRc_FTb_Treasurers_books_1548_to_1913/ DRc_FTb_062.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester

Finance records: treasurer

Treasurers' books 1548-1913 (DRc/FTb 1-243)

Each book is as a general rule divided up as follows: salaries paid to the Dean, prebendaries, minor canons, lay readers, choirmaster, organist, choristers, King's scholars, officers, stewards, counsellor, bailiff, and other church officers; the royal subsidy and annuity; pensions to the clergy; episcopal fees (exenia); alms; reparations to the fabric of the cathedral; exhibitions for King's scholars; expenses at law: extraordinary expenses and highway repair; necessaries; wood for fuel; carriage; and other items.

Giving lists of names and signatures of recipients arranged under headings as per cathedral officers, canons, prebends, choristers, paupers [beadsmen] and pupils of the Cathedral Grammar School.

Treasurer's book - Edmund Barrell

Includes under expenses necessary and uncertain: 7s 6d paid to William Holmes, smith, for making a new eye to the clapper of the fourth bell, 17 June 1728

Includes expenses incurred in restoring the cathedral (pp.39-40 and passim)

Includes 1s alms given to William Groves and William Lankstone from the Clink (Chink) prison in Southwark [Surrey], 18 January 1728

Includes 1s 6d alms given to a poor Turk [cf. Turkey] turned Christian, 24 January 1728

Includes 1s 6 alms given to George Tomlin, a poor decayed tanner of Town Malling [cf. West Malling], 7 February 1728

Includes 6d alms given to Stephen Petitoe another discharged soldier, 13 February 1728

Includes 1s 6d alms given to Robert Stout with his wife, child and servant, taken by the Turks [cf. Turkey], 23 February 1728

Includes 1s alms given to William Benstead a poor soldier from Gibraltar, 7 March 1728

Includes 6d alms given to George Thomas of Bristol [cf. Somerset, Gloucestershire] with a pass, 25 March 1728

Includes 3 guineas alms given to the Rev. Mr. Painter, a necessitous clergyman, in order to make his creditors easy with him, 26 June 1728

Includes 6d alms given to Hugh Montgommery [cf. Montgomery] and Richard Stackburn, poor seamen, 13 August 1728

Includes 1s alms given to John Augustin, a Neapolitan [cf. Naples, Campania, Italy] shipwrecked on the coast of France, 26 August 1728

Includes 6d alms given to Thomas Day of Bristol [cf. Somerset, Gloucestershire] with a pass from New Romney, 2 September 1728

Includes 6d alms given to William Newton, a prisoner in Reading [Berkshire] Jail, 18 September 1728

Includes £1 1s alms given to Mr. Charles Harris, son of Dr. Harris, late prebendary of this church, 21 September 1728

Includes alms given to numerous discharged soldiers and shipwrecked French * sailors, passim

Latin and English.

[* cf. France.]

File updated by Borough Archivist 13 November 2001.

Date: 1727-1728
Quantity: 1 volume/71pp. used
Result number 19 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTv_044 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 02_DRc_FTv_Bills_and_vouchers_1552_to_1867/ DRc_FTv_044.html

Finance records: treasurer

Bills and vouchers 1552-1867 (DRc/FTv 1-231)

Treasurer's Vouchers, comprising beadsmen's receipts, receipts for payment of bishop's Xenium for visitation, bills for tradesmenís work, bills for liturgical and sacramental supplies, bills for candles and tapers, bills for stationery, bills for giving of sermons, lists of quitrents and tenants, receipts for litigation and legal opinions, receipts for payments of tax, parish clergy pension receipts, receipts for alms disbursed, receipts for apprenticeship agreements for children apprenticed out by the Dean and Chapter, receipts for officers' salaries and maintenance of children in the care of the cathedral.

Includes claim for reimbursement for payment of 7s 6d to Elizabeth Harman, daughter of a Poor Knight of Windsor, Berkshire by John Grant, 14 May 1711 (DRc/FTv 44/2);

Includes bill from John Taylor for upholstery, receipted 9 March 1710/1711 (DRc/FTv 44/3);

Includes affidavit from George Stanhope DD, vicar of Deptford, as to Gabriel Chapman, chapter cook, pensioner, being alive and well and living in Deptford, 29 September 1711 (DRc/FTv 44/11);

Includes affidavits as above and order for payment of pension to Mrs. Phoebe Gardener, near Nag's Head, The Bank, Chatham, addressee, appended with letter from Chapman as above, to her to pay part to Mrs. Jane Evans, her sister, via a Mrs. Beach also of Chatham, mentioning his children, affidavait dated 20 December 1710, 27 March 1711 and 9 July 1711 (DRc/FTv 44/12, 31 and 32);

Includes bill from George Russell for surveying part of chapter estate in Rochester comprising gardens and houses, for surveying timber in Cobham Park and for visit to Cobham Hall with a Mr. [John] Grant to show latter and a Mr. Hornsby plot and boundaries of same, receipted 4 December 1711 (DRc/FTv 44/18);

Includes receipt from William White for payment of £3 relief for a Mr. Ward of Wouldham, 10 July 1711 (DRc/FTv 44/23)

Includes bill from John Grant for 4s 6d for horse hire in viewing woods at Cobham, 24 May 1711 (DRc/FTv 44/25);

Includes bill from George Stockwell of Bond Street, Piccadilly, London on behalf of his wife Elizabeth the widow of Bernard Smith for Smith's looking after the organ, August 1711 (DRc/FTv 44/26) (4 items sewn together);

Includes bill from Simon Lambe for repairs to steeple and doors and for cleaning militia arms and clock, etc., 19 May and 13 November 1711 (DRc/FTv 44/33-34)


Date: 1710-1711
Quantity: 1 bundle/34pp.
Result number 20 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/01_Intro on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/ 01_Intro.html

MEDWAY ARCHIVES AND LOCAL STUDIES CENTRE

DRc

RECORDS OF THE DEAN AND CHAPTER OF ROCHESTER c.1080-1964

Click here to view the full list of the Rochester Priory records or select the folder from the query tool by following the instructions given there.

These archives were deposited by the Dean and Chapter of Rochester in the Kent Archives Office [now Centre for Kentish Studies], County Hall, Maidstone, Kent in 1959, and were listed there by Miss Anne M. Oakley MA FSA between the years 1963-1970. The collection was transferred to Medway Archives Office on 27 April 1992 and the list prepared and edited for for CityArk Phase II by the City Archivist/Borough Archivist 1997-2001

Re-edited by Borough Archivist July 2000 (Priory introduction).

For a link to the Rochester Cathedral web site Click Here ......or here [two different sites appear to be in operation as at 3 July 2000]

Historical Introduction

The church of St. Andrew the Apostle, Rochester was founded by Ethelbert, King of Kent as a college for a small number of secular canons under Justus, Bishop of Rochester in AD 604. Very little is know about the history of this house. It never seems to have had much influence outside its own walls, and though it possessed considerable landed estates, seems to have been relatively small and poor. It also suffered at the hands of the Danes [cf. Denmark]. Bishops Justus, Romanus, Paulinus and Ithamar were all remarkable men, but after Bishop Putta's translation to Hereford [cf. Herefordshire] in AD 676, very little is heard of Rochester. Their bishop, Siweard is not mentioned as having been at the Battle of Hastings in Sussex with King Harold as were many of the Saxon bishops and abbots, and the house put up no opposition to King William I when he seized their lands and gave them to his lay brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, Normandy, France whom he had created Earl of Kent. The chroniclers say that the house was destitute and that when Siweard died in 1075 it was barely able to support the five canons on the establishment (1).

Four years after his conquest of England, King William I invited his friend Lanfranc, Prior of Caen, Normandy, France and a former monk of Bec in there to be his archbishop at Canterbury. Lanfranc's task was specific: to reorganise English monasticism on the pattern of Bec; to develop a strict cloistered monasticism but one of a kind that was not entirely cut off by physical barriers from the life of the rest of the church. He drew unsparingly on Bec for his ideas, his bishops and his monks. Four bishops of Rochester hailed from Bec, several priors and many monks. Among the bishops, by far the most important was Gundulf, his friend, pupil and chamberlain whom he brought over with him to England in 1070 (2).

(1) This account of the cathedral priory of St. Andrew the Apostle, Rochester is based on those in The Victoria County History of Kent II, pp. 121-125, E. Hasted, History of Kent II, pp. 22-25, F.F. Smith, History of Rochester pp. 273-335; W.H. St. John Hope The Architectural History of the Cathedral Church and Monastery of St Andrew at Rochester, Archaeologia Cantiana XXIII, pp. 194-328 and XXIV, pp 1-85; and H. Wharton, Anglia Sacra, I, pp. 329-394. Part of King Ethelbert's endowment included the land from the river Medway to the Eastgate of the City of Rochester on the south part and practically all the land on the south side of the High Street, all within the city walls. The priory property was extended on the same site in 1225 and again in 1344 making necessary the construction of new walls and ditches on both occasions. (See also DRc/T62, T280).

Siweard, Bishop of Rochester died in 1075 and to replace him Lanfranc brought over a monk from Bec, Arnost, as Bishop. He died within the year and at Lanfranc's instigation, King William I agreed to the appointment of Gundulf as bishop. This proved ultimately the turning point in the history of Rochester (3). King William showed no reluctance or lack of effort in assisting Lanfranc to recover the former properties of the church now that his relations with his lay brother had become strained and difficult and in 1076, therefore, Lanfranc successfully repossessed himself of a major part of the lands which had once belonged to St. Andrew's church at the great assembly held on Penenden Heath. Some of this property formed the principal re-endowment of the house in 1077 and was given by Lanfranc to Gundulf when he enthroned him as Bishop of Rochester in that year.

Edmund de Hadenham [cf. Haddenham, Buckinghamshire], the thirteenth century chronicler, says that Lanfranc made it a condition of his friend's establishment at Rochester that the canons should be replaced by monks, but as no other establishment was made until 1083, it would appear that Gundulf bided his time. No one knows now what really happened. There is a brief mention in the Textus Roffensis of one Aegelric, priest of Chatham and a former Canon of Rochester who made a gift to the new house to secure the honourable burial of his wife there, but not a word more.

In 1083 Lanfranc visited Rochester and himself instituted twenty two monks of the Benedictine order in the house, some from Bec (4), probably some from the two houses at Canterbury, Christchurch and St Augustine, and possibly some from Caen. He endowed the house with property making careful and distinct provision for the bishop and the monks. Some of the lands he gave them were his own, others he purchased, and some he had acquired in 1076. Gundulf also purchased and acquired a great deal of property for his house which rapidly found favour with the Norman kings. Together with Archbishop Lanfranc he began the rebuilding of the church and monastery buildings. In the rebuilding of his church, Gundulf followed the usual practice of starting his new building to the east of the existing church so that there would be no interruption in the services of the church. He also appears to have incorporated part of the City wall into his building as the tower known as Gundulf's tower was one of the watch towers (5). Substantial parts of his work remain today, particularly in the Crypt.

[(2) D. Knowles, The Monastic Order in England , 2nd ed. pp. 83-134
(3) There is an excellent translation of the Life of Gundulf by the nuns of St. Marys Abbey, West Malling 1968.
(4) Knowles op cit p.112

No distinction was made in the early years of the refoundation between the episcopal and prioral possessions. The reason for this was simply that there was no need for any such distinction. The bishop of Rochester was titular abbot of St Andrews and the prior was directly subject to him. At least until the first quarter of the twelfth century the Bishop actually lived in the house with the monks as one of the family (6). John of Seez was probably the first bishop to set up a separate establishment, but Bishop Gundulf himself made some division of the properties between himself and the monks before his death in 1108 (7). Until the thirteenth century, gifts were made to the bishop or to the bishop and the monks of St Andrew's Church, Rochester but very rarely to the prior although it is more than probable that the offer was in existence from the refoundation (8). During the thirteenth century benefactors addressed their charters to the prior by name and the monks of St Andrew's church, Rochester, or first to the prior and monks of that place. It was not [contd.]

(5) See DRc/emf77
(6) This was also true at Christchurch, Canterbury until Stephen Langton became archbishop. It was, in any case, the natural thing to do, and exactly what one would have expected of Gundulf who thought of himself primarily as a monk. Lanfranc himself explicitly equated the offers of bishop and abbot. Knowles op. cit. p.622.

(7) See DRc/T47 and DRc/T57/5, a charter of Gundulf confirmed by Theobald, Archbishop of Canterbury in 1145. It was not until about 1125 that the influence of the black monks ceased to predominate. The canonical organisation of chapters tended to separate the bishop from the monastery and to give the foreign to monastic life. Knowles op. cit, p.133.

(8) DRc/T47-59]

until about 1260 that the term prior and convent became at all common. The inspeximus of King Henry III is addressed to the prior and convent of Rochester and this was the first occasion on which a royal charter had been so addressed (9).

When Lanfranc established the house at Rochester under the ministry of Gundulf, he is said to have realised that difficulties would arise over communally held property and therefore made careful division between the bishop and the monks. At first sight, this might seem a good idea, but the greatest difficulty of all lay in the fact that most of Lanfranc's re-endowment was made up of properties which had belonged to the church before the conquest of 1066. Properties involved included the manor and churches of St. Margaret, Rochester, Stoke, Wouldham, Frindsbury, East Wickham, Halling, Trottiscliffe, Borstal, Snodland, Cuxton, Malling, Denton, Longfield, Darenth, Southfleet and Fawkham. They were given to the church by Saxon Kings and nobles, but they were entrusted to the bishop. In Lanfranc's time there was no difficulty, nor could he foresee any, for while the bishop was a monk and lived in harmony with his monks no difficulty would present itself. Gundulf may have foreseen difficulties. Before he died he made further provision for the monks. As well as considerable pensions, tithes and rents, he gave them the manors of Stoke, Wouldham, Frindsbury, Denton, Southfleet, Lambeth (Surrey) and Haddenham (Buckinghamshire) King Henry I confirmed all these and also his gifts of the churches of Wouldham, Dartford, Woolwich, Sutton at Hone, Wilmington, Chislehurst, Aylesford, St. Margaret, Rochester, St. Nicholas' altar in Rochester Cathedral, Rotherfield and Stourmouth; he added Boxley church and Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury added Norton church (10).

The house was wealthy, but when Ernulf of Bec died in 1124 it was the end of an era for the monks. King Henry I nominated John of Seez, Archdeacon of Canterbury to the vacant see and though they elected him as their bishop, the monks viewed him with suspicion. He was not a monk. During his short episcopate the prior became the effective head of the house. The bishop's duties changed and he became more a patron than a father, making occasional visits only and barely known to his monks.

[(9) DRc/T60
(10) DRc/T47-51]

He had his own household, separate from theirs and this separation of revenues and interests combined to make him and his successors a stranger to his monks and more often than not an opponent. The chronicler, Edmund de Hadenham [cf. Haddenham, Buckinghamshire] offers John of Seez no compliments. He says he made lavish gifts, began great things and did much good, but that it did not last (11). He took advantage of a great fire that ravaged the house in 1137, dispersed many of the monks to other houses, and stole from them the churches of Aylesford, Southfleet, Boxley, St. Margaret, Rochester and the altar of St. Nicholas in Rochester Cathedral, thus plunging the house into years of expensive litigation which ended only in 1144 when Pope Celistine decreed that the new bishop, Ascelin, should return them unconditionally to the monks to whom they rightfully belonged (12).

John's argument is obvious: The reason even more so. The revenues of the priory were far larger than those of the bishopric. On this occasion the monks were successful, but far more serious contentions broke out under Bishop Gilbert Glanville fifty years later which reverberated through the centuries.

Gilbert Glanville was Archdeacon of Lisieux in France. He was a great friend of Archbishop Baldwin of Canterbury and his successor there Archbishop Hubert Walter, and much in favour at court. He became Bishop of Rochester in 1184. His predecessor Waleran had proposed to seek papal permission to expel the monks from the cathedral, as he had a low opinion of the regular orders, but had died before he could implement the idea. Unfortunately for the monks, the plan was not uncountenanced by King Henry II who wished to cut the power of the regular orders, in so many ways exempt from the royal prerogative. Rochester, for instance, had the right to elect its own prior without royal interference, and had also enormous privileges within the City of Rochester. King Henry II therefore chose his friend Gilbert Glanville, together with Baldwin, Archbishop of Canterbury and Hugh Nonant, Bishop of Coventry to use Rochester as an experiment. They were to set up a college of secular canons who were not, in general, infected with principles dangerous to civil government, and who as friends of the national clergy, would form a powerful barrier against the encroachments of the roman pontiffs.

[(11) Wharton, op.cit., p.347
(12) DRc/L1]

Except at Coventry where force was used to set up a college of Vicars Choral, nothing came of the idea as the King's death put an end to all hopes of success, but disastrous failure though it was, it did nothing to ease relations between the bishop and his monks (13).

Gilbert Glanville remained in favour with the new king, Richard I and when he was captured in the Holy Land and later imprisoned in Germany, worked with a will to secure his release. His principal contribution was the establishment of the hospital of the New Work of St. Mary in Strood. This was a small house whose purpose was to pray for the restoration of Christianity in the Kingdom of Jerusalem and for the King's release from captivity, and to provide for the poor and travellers. It was a cause worthy of the monks' support, but without consulting them, the bishop appropriated two of their churches for the support of his new foundation, and further bribed their prior, Ralph de Ros, to give a piece of meadowland in Strood to the hospital in return for money to finish the stonework of the cathedral cloister and for a new pair of organs (14). Matters were made worse by the fact that the churches the bishop appropriated were Aylesford and St. Margaret, Rochester, only recently won back at great expense.

The monks complained. They petitioned the Pope to intervene and he did in fact do so, but to no purpose. The bishop forced the monks into an agreement to maintain the house as he had founded it together with the lands and churches he had given to it (15). The agreement remained more or less in force until 1239, then in 1256 the Pope declared that the churches should be returned to the monks. Gilbert was long since dead, buried in haste and deprived of the last rites, during the Interdict, but his successor refused to comply. The quarrel finally came to the test in the reign of Edward I when the monks were ambushed and beaten up by the monks at Strood while they were attempting to pass in procession through the hospital grounds (16). After this debate, the monks of Rochester gave up what was obviously an unequal struggle.

[(13) The History and Antiquities of Rochester and its Environs by John Denne, ed. by T. Fisher, 1817 pp. 112-115
(14) DRc/T572/1-15
(15) DRc/L3
(16) William Lambard, Perambulation of Kent , 1570 gives a spirited account of this incident, which, though he was violently anti-catholic, is most graphic. 1826 edition, pp. 328-331]

The Monks' quarrel with Gilbert Glanville stretched far beyond Strood Hospital to other problems which caused proportionate dissension: rights of presentation; the Bishop's xenium ; and the disposition of servants in the priory.

On the first problem, the Monks claimed rights of presentation to churches in their possession both within and outside the diocese of Rochester. In 1207 they possessed at least eleven within and seven outside the diocese, but they laid claim to others that belonged to the Bishop. On his part the Bishop made no claim to any. He merely stated that when John was Bishop he had never asked the Monks for authority. He had always presented and instituted incumbents to all vacant livings both inside and outside the diocese, but had secured to them their rightful pensions, which was all they were entitled to. Further Gilbert Glanville added that he proposed to do likewise, with the sole concession that those he instituted should do fealty to the Monks as well as himself (17). This was a meaningless concession. Although the Monks gave way on the Bishop's right of institution, they always denied that he had any right to present to priory livings inside the diocese. They did, however, reach agreement over presentations to livings outside the diocese of Rochester. The Bishop here claimed joint right of presentation with the Monks, and though they knew he had none, they allowed his claim; and as witness that they did so and kept their agreement at least in part, there is a document surviving among these archives showing the strictness with which it was adhered to in the cases of Norton, Boxley and Stourmouth in the diocese of Canterbury for over 150 years (18). The problem was not so much one of fees but of influence and authority. It emphasises the Bishop's ultimate authority over the priory and the Monks' refusal to accept it. Gilbert Glanville's interpretations of their charters were often wrong, but the Monks found that there was little they could do in defence of their rights.

[(17) DRc/L3
(18) DRc/L10]

The Disagreement over the Bishop's xenium is an interesting one. The income from the Bishop's estates was fairly small and the xenium was a recognised method of providing for hospitality at his table. The word itself signifies a gift made in token of hospitality. This was a particularly lavish one consisting of 16 suckling pigs, 30 geese, 300 hens, 1,000 lampreys, 1,000 eggs, four salmon and other items from each of the five principal priory manors of Frindsbury, Stoke, Wouldham, Denton and Southfleet, and further gifts of fish from Lambeth, Surrey and Haddenham, Buckinghamshire. It was Bishop Gundulf who had ordained in 1107 that the xenium should be given to the Bishop on St. Andrew's day (17 November) but with the important, and in this case, significant proviso that if the Bishop was away from Rochester on that day, it should be given to the poor (19). The Monks appear to have resented making the gift, and refused to bring it when the Bishop was away. They argued that it was an imposition and that it was contrary to the ordinance that the Bishop should have it if he were away. Gundulf had never imagined a time when the Bishop would not be present in his church at the patronal festival, and Gilbert Glanville argued in his defence that he was forced to travel and could not always arrange to be there. He, therefore, fiercely opposed the Monks and claimed the xenium as his right wherever he might be on that day (20). In the end the Monks were forced to surrender. This was a major victory for Bishop Gilbert and one of which he and his successors took full advantage. In 1329 the Monks accused Bishop Hamo de Hethe [cf. Hythe] of abusing the system. They claimed he ought by ancient custom to celebrate St. Andrew's day in the cathedral and in the hall adjoining and there receive a present of ten pounds from the prior and Chapter towards his expenses, but that each year he had received the present without performing the ceremony, had left the prior and Chapter to do it, and to pay for it as well (21). The Bishop's answer has not survived. Suffice to say that the xenium survived even the dissolution and was still being paid in the eighteenth century (22).

[(19) DRc/T47
(20) DRc/L3
(21) Registrum Hamonis Hethe Diocesis Roffensis A.D. 1319-1352 transcribed and edited by Charles Johnson, Oxford 1948, pp. 424-431 and Introduction.
(22) DRc/FTv34]

According to Edmund de Hadenham [cf. Haddenham, Buckinghamshire], Ascelin was the first Bishop of Rochester to interfere in the appointment of priory servants (23). When Bishop Gundulf had lived with the Monks there was one set of servants and officials to look after both the Bishop and the Monks, but after the fire of 1137 and the almost total destruction of the conventual buildings, the Bishop set up a separate household. The priory servants apparently joined him and the Monks appointed others. There were over twenty of these servants and officials, all essential to the smooth running of a Benedictine house and all equally indispensible. Their number included the master baker, the second baker, three other bakers, brewers, cooks, a steward, janitor, guestmaster, granger, infirmarer, tailors and launderers to name only a few. Each official's work was carefully laid down but more important than this, so also were his salary and perquisites (24). It was these perquisites, often free food and drink, which made these offices so popular. Many of the servants and officials were related to Monks in the priory. Nepotism was rife. It appears that Ascelin withdrew the priory servants for this reason but a visiting legate reproved him saying it was not his business to interfere. Ascelin relented and the legate attempted to improve matters by making the posts annual appointments rather than permanent ones, but to no purpose. The sons of master bakers still succeeded their fathers and one of them even found favour by marrying the cellarer's sister.

[(23) Wharton, op.cit., p.343
(24) Custumale Roffense ff.53-60.]

The legate Hinemar's suggestions did not solve the problem. The Monks were still complaining under Bishop Gilbert Glanville that he interfered too much in this sphere (25). Gilbert Glanville doubtless had many relatives he wished to provide for, but he cannot have had more than Bishop Hamo de Hethe who was one of the chief offenders on this score. When Simon de Meopham made his archiepiscopal visitation of the priory in 1329 the Monks made 25 complaints against their Bishop, four of which related to this problem. They complained that he appointed to twenty or more offices in the priory when he was entitled to only four or five; that he appointed his own kinsmen and others to priory offices who did their work by deputy and at half wages, too ill paid to be honest; that the officers and their deputies took no notice when reprimanded, and said that they like the Monks were irremovable; and specifically that he had appointed a brewer who was inefficient and of ill fame. Most of the charges against Hamo de Hethe [cf. Hythe] were dismissed but the Monks' claims were not unfounded on their first charge. The Bishop's family name was Noble and there are many appointments of persons of this name in his register (26).

[(25) DRc/L3
(26) Registrum Hamonis p.425 and Introduction]

Apart from their endless conflict with the Bishops in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, there were three other problems of conflict which affected the priory, all of them outside the walls: the position of the priory in relation to the Crown and the Castle; relations with the Citizens of Rochester; and relations with the archdiocese of Canterbury.

The first stone keep is said to have been built at Rochester for King William II by Bishop Gundulf for the then enormous sum of sixty pounds, in return for a gift of land in Haddenham, Buckinghamshire. The priory buildings lay in the shadow of the castle and suffered somewhat in the wars in which it featured. Kings did not, however, neglect the priory. Some visited it, and there is a series of charters of privileges to prove their interest and concern. Many charters repeat the fact that William Rufus was eternally grateful to the monks and their Bishop for supporting him when his uncle Odo, Bishop of Bayeux rebelled against him and besieged Rochester and its castle. The monks lost a good deal in the battle of 1088. Much of their house was destroyed but the Manor of Haddenham rectory, Buckinghamshire proved a lucrative present and, moreover, gave them a link with the past. It had belonged to the Countess Goda, sister of King Edward the Confessor, a fact which several charters also repeat (27)

. There were many skirmishes involving the castle over the years but no further sieges until 1216 when the priory was pillaged by King John and his followers. But the most spectacular siege and the one which the monks turned most to their advantage was that of 1264. In that year, says Rishanger, the Chronicler, Simon de Montfort and the rebel barons brought great siege engines and fire ships to Rochester and prosecuted the siege with great violence. Some of the priory buildings were very badly damaged and Simon and his soldiers broke in a carried off the priory monuments. The story is told on the back of one small deed (28). It tells how the charter and many others were stolen from the prior's chapel where they were kept and carried off to Winchester, and how John de Renham [Rainham], the prior got them back from the robbers but with the seals all broken and many of the charters torn and damaged. He was appalled at the danger in which this might place his house, and at great labour and personal expense persuaded King Henry III to reconfirm all the damaged charters by a new one (29). This the King did. The charter embodies most of the charters granted to the priory since the conquest by Kings, Archbishops, Bishops and other persons. And there is no doubt that this is in fact the charter concerned because, its content apart, there is attached to the seal strings another cord woven into it, to which is attached a small fragment of very heavily cross-stitched parchment, all that remains of the earlier charters.

A great many of the charters in the possession of the priory were damaged in this incident. Therefore to supply the deficiencies not remedied by the new Royal Charter, and also to circumvent some of the problems of the division of property between themselves and their Bishop, the monks resorted to forgery. This was not so much a crime as it is now. Rather, it was a necessity. Once forged documents had been used to prove title they acquired the force of the genuine article. It is of course unnecessary to remark that documents were conveniently lost and suppressed if their contents proved a nuisance.

[(27) DRc/T48, T60 (1), T65 (1)
(28) DRc/T53 and F.F. Smith, History of Rochester p.17
(29) DRc/T60]

There are at least two forged charters among these archives, both charters of Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, life long friend of Bishop Gundulf and a great benefactor to Rochester. The first charter refers to Northfleet Church which Anselm gave to the monks. The monks had the presentation but Hubert Walter and successive Archbishops attempted to wrest it from them. Probably in 1264 (or possibly before) the seal was lost from the document and to give it more force a new seal has been made from a cast. It is quite easy to spot. Firstly it has been attached upside down, and secondly there is a shallow depression in the middle of the figure of the Archbishop caused by an airbubble (30). This document is genuine enough. The second is not. It relates to the great quarrels with the Bishops over property. It has no seal and purports to be a charter of Anselm making over to the priory many churches and manors most of which belonged to the Bishop of Rochester (31). The handwriting very closely resembles that of the new charter of 1265 (32). It may even have been written by the same scribe. It has, however, one fault. The charter is dated 1101 by which year four at least of the twelve witnesses were dead and had been dead for several years before Anselm became Archbishop of Canterbury. There are five Bishops included among the witnesses: Maurice of London, Osmund of Salisbury (Wiltshire), Walkelin of Rochester, Stigand of Chichester (Sussex)and Herbert of Thetford (Norfolk). Only Maurice was alive in 1101. Herbert died in 1085, Stigand in 1087, Walkelin in 1098 and Osmund in 1099. Anselm became Archbishop in 1093.

[(30) DRc/T49
(31) DRc/T48
(32) DRc/T60]

There was constant disagreement between the monks and the people of the City of Rochester. The people had no parish church of their own and worshipped at the alter of St. Nicholas which stood before the rood screen in the nave of the Cathedral Church (33). The monks appear to have disliked this system since it brought them into close contact with the populace from whom they wished to remain apart; it disturbed their peace and meant that their church was not their own. Admittedly it was the common custom for the local people to worship in the nave of a monastic church and is the reason why many have survived as parish churches, but it was a sore bone of contention at Rochester. The Benedictine order had moved away from Gundulf's ideal of a monastic church not entirely cut off by physical barriers from the life of the rest of the church. They shut the doors at night and refused the sacrament to the sick; they denied services; and in 1327 they locked the doors of the nave and took away the key. The Bishop forced the monks to come to an agreement with the citizens and on 14 June 1327 it was accordingly agreed that the monks should build an oratory for the citizens in the corner of the nave near the north door with a door and window on the outside of the church for the sacrament for the sick during the night, to which the people should have free entry and exit. They were also guaranteed all the usual daily services (34). The Bishop was sympathetic to their cause and successive Bishops of Rochester tried hard to have a church built for the citizens, but it was not until almost a hundred years after this agreement that this became a reality and St. Nicholas' Church was built beside the Cathedral (35).

[(33) DRc/Emf 77
(34) DRc/L7
(35) Rochester Episcopal Register III, DRc/T60/ff.16v.-18v.

Relations with Canterbury were equally bad. Lanfranc's refoundation at Rochester was modelled on Canterbury. He appointed the first Bishop of Rochester, and the see was thereafter recognised as being in the free gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury. It was thus peculiarly dependent on Canterbury, and as a mark of this dependence, it was customary on the death of their Bishop for the monks of Rochester to take the deceased bishop's pastoral staff to Canterbury where it was laid on the alter in Christchurch Priory, and from where the newly elected Bishop took it after his consecration. Not all the Bishops of Rochester were consecrated at Canterbury. Arnost was consecrated at St. Paul's in London but his immediate successors Gundulf, Ralph and Ernulf at Canterbury. Ascelin also may have been; his successor Walter, brother of Archbishop Theobald, certainly was. It appears that the monks of Rochester objected not to the act of consecration by the Archbishop, or indeed that it took place at Canterbury, but to the claims of the prior of Christchurch that he represented the Church of Canterbury. This was a strange argument for the monks to put forward. They persistently and continually opposed their own diocesan and ought by right to have supported the claim of the prior of Christchurch.

Rivalry between the two houses grew, and in order to avoid the humiliating ceremony after the death of Bishop Waleran in 1183, the monks buried the Bishop's pastoral staff with him in the grave. The monks of Christchurch protested. The rights of the mother church, they declared, must be maintained at all costs and the episcopal staff delivered to the prior. Negotiations were begun. They dragged on for years and years, but for the moment a compromise was reached. The monks of Rochester agreed to deliver the staff, not to the prior but instead to the Archbishop who would deliver it for them. Gilbert Glanville was consecrated by Archbishop Baldwin in 1184 at Canterbury, and as usual in the absence of the Archbishop, took over the administration of his see while he was in the Holy Land. Benedict of Sawston was consecrated at Oxford - a belated attempt to escape from the overlordship of Canterbury; and later Lawrence of St. Martin, one of the King's clerks who became Bishop of Rochester in 1251 instituted litigation to try and secure some measure of independence for Rochester. This he did in the face of Royal disapproval, for both King Henry III and his Queen favoured the primate, and if the negotiations did not have the required results as far as independence was concerned, at least they improved relations between the Bishop and his monks (36).

[(36) DRc/L2, see Wharton, op.cit., pp.342-351; C.E. Woodruff and W. Danks, Memorials of Canterbury Cathedral p.104. Hasted, op.cit, 2nd ed.,IV, p.124 says the Archbishop did not interfere after 1238.]

It is exceedingly difficult to follow the trend of numbers of monks in the priory as the information available is somewhat inadequate. Archbishop Lanfranc introduced twenty-two monks into the house whom he instituted in 1083. When Bishop Gundulf died in March 1108 there were, according to Edmund de Hadenhem [cf. Haddenham] sixty monks some of the best read and the best singers in the Country (37). He also claims that numbers fell off after Gundulf's death but this may be accounted for by the fact that in accordance with the system of Bec, monks from well established houses were continually being sent out to help found and replenished other houses. It is known that monks went out from Rochester to the house of St. John at Colchester (Essex) founded by Eudo Dapifer in 1119/1120 (38) and to Christchurch, Canterbury in 1207 (39). There were apparently only 35 monks at Rochester in 1317; only 30 voted at the election of John de Sheppey as prior in 1333 (40) and these were doubtless drastically reduced by the pestilence which raged in Rochester between 1349-1352 (41). There are only 190 instances in the Rochester episcopal registers of monks entering the priory there for the period between 1320-1537 but this presupposes that all the monks in the house went through the various orders of the priesthood there. Obviously this was not the case and the registers of other bishoprics should be searched to determine an entry figure if this is possible. From the list compiled it would appear that there were far more candidates entering the priory between 1460-1537 than between 1320-1460. Twenty-three monks voted at the election of Lawrence Dan or Mereworth as prior in 1532 (42) and he and nineteen monks took the oath of supremacy on 10th June 1534. Only twelve monks received pensions in May 1541 but this number did not include those provided for under the secular establishment (43). From the figures given here, it would appear that there were normally about 30 monks at Rochester for most of the period of the existence of the priory.

[(37) Wharton, op.cit, p.337
(38) Archaeologia Cantiana XXIII, p.224
(39) Knowles, op.cit, p.365. There is also a case recorded in the Priors' Book concerning William Lecestre who was released from his oath of obedience to the prior of Rochester so that he could go to St. Giles Cornwall in the diocese of Coventry (Warwickshire) and Lichfield (Staffordshire) where Hugh Lempster was prior. This was in 1480. No reason is given for the transfer. DRc/Elb1A f.6
(40) Rochester Episcopal Register I, f.157. This was a disputed election: 22 monks led by the late prior John de Speldhurst voted for John de Sheppey, 5 led by Richard Bledlawe, the cellarer and his subcellarer Peter de Lambourne, for Willam de Reyersshe [Ryarsh] the sacrist; and 3 young monks for Robert de Suthflete [Southfleet].
(41) DRc/F1A
(42) Rochester Episcopal Register IV, f.73
(43) Calender of Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic. Henry VIII, Vol.XIV, 1540-1541, p.356 no.745, f.30 (November) and p.718 (May)]
When a man became a monk in a religious house, he discarded his own surname after his profession and was known instead by this Christian name and that of the place or parish from whence he came. For this reason it is a simple matter to determine the area from which monks came to Rochester priory. Most of them were local men from Rochester and its neighbouring parishes, some came from Canterbury, Folkestone, Dover, Hythe and Dartford; but as can be seen from the list compiled of the monks passing through the various orders of the priesthood, at lease nine came from London, several from Norfolk, three from Oxford, two from St. Albans (Hertfordshire) one from Ossory in Ireland, one from Winchester (Hampshire) and one from Mayfield in Sussex. The list has been compiled almost exclusively from the Rochester Episcopal registers.

In the early years the priors were probably Frenchmen: Ernulf came from Bec and Ralph from Caen, but as Rochester had the privilege of electing its priors without Royal interference, the tradition of electing a man from within the house itself developed very rapidly, and by the third quarter of the twelfth century this was probably standard practice. There was one exception to this rule. William Fresell who was elected in 1509 had previously been prior of Binham in Norfolk (44). After the migration of Alfred to Abingdon (Berkshire) between 1185-1189 none of the priors left to go to other houses. If they resigned their office, they remained in the house until their death. There are, of course, several exceptions: William de Hoo [St. Werburgh] who retired to Woburn in Bedfordshire; and those priors who resigned on their election to the bishopric, Thomas de Wouldham, Hamo de Hethe [Hythe] and John de Sheppey (45)

[(44) Rochester Episcopal Register IV, f.53. He took the following oath: In dei nomine Amen. Ego Willelmus Fressell Monachus expresse professus ordinis sancti Benedicti prior monasterii ecclesie vestre cathedralis sancti Andree Roffensis per provisionem et nominacionem vestras iuxta antiquas ordinaciones ecclesie vestre predicte prefectus sive nominatus promitto ad sancta dei evangelia vobis et successoribus vestris canonice intrandum et ministrandum vestris canonicam obedienciam Reverenciam et honorem necnon observanciam antiquarum ordinacium prefate ecclesie vestre cathedralis sicut me deus adiumet et sancta dei evangelia.

(45) Wharton, op.cit Successio Priorum, pp.392-399]

File updated by Borough Archivist, Medway Council 9 August 2001.
Date: n/a
Quantity: n/a


Result number 21 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/02_Intro on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/ 02_Intro.html

THE CATHEDRAL PRIORY OF ST. ANDREW THE APOSTLE, ROCHESTER

Click here to view the full list of the Rochester Priory records or select the folder from the query tool by following the instructions given there.

List of priors of St. Andrew, Rochester

Ordwin occurs 1089; deposed (Wharton, Anglia Sacra p.392
Ernulf (46)occurs 1093-1096 ( Textus Roffensis DRc/R1/ f.179; DRc/T49); resigned 1096
Ralph (47)succeeded 1096 (Wharton, op. cit p.392); resigned 1107
Ordwin re-elected 1107 ( Textus Roffensis DRc/R1/f.198; DRc/T47)
Letard c.1115-1125 (DRc/T310/1); occurs 1144
Brian c.1142-1148 ( Registrum Temporalium q.12 f.5); occurs 1145 (DRc/T57(5)), 1146
Reginald occurs 1154
Ernulf c.1148-1182 (DRc/L5/3)
William de Borstalle [i.e. Borstal] (48)
Silvester (49)occurs 1177 (DRc/L17), 1178
Richard (50)resigned 1182
Alfred (51) Osbern de Scapeya [i.e. Sheppey] (52) Ralph de Ros (53) occurs 1199; (see DRc/T572/14)

[(46) Monk of Bec [France]. Prior of Canterbury 1096; Abbot of Peterborough (Northamptonshire) 1107; Bishop of Rochester 1115-1125
(47) Monk of Caen, Normandy, France. Came to England with Lanfranc. Abbot of Battle, Sussex 1107. See DRc/T47
(48) Cellarer (Wharton, op. cit. p.393)
(49) Cellarer (ibid)
(50) Abbot of Burton, died 19 April 1188 ( ibid )
(51) Abbot of Abingdon (Berkshire) between 1185-1189 (ibid)
(52) Sacrist ( ibid )
(53) Sacrist ( ibid )]

Elias occurs 1214 (DRc/T193/1)
William occurs 1222
Richard de Derente [i.e. Darenth] elected 1225; occurs 1228 (Wharton, op.cit. p.393), 1230 (DRc/T354/4), 1236, 1238 (Wharton, op.cit. p.393)
William de Hoo [i.e. St. Werburgh or Hundred] (54)elected 1239; occurs 1241 (DRc/L12)
Alexander de Glanville elected 1242; died suddenly 1252 Wharton op.cit. 393
Simon de Clyve [Cliffe] (55)
John de Renham [Rainham] (56) elected 1262; deposed 1283
Thomas de Wouldham (57) elected 1283; resigned 1291
John de Renham [Rainham] re-elected 1292; died 1294
Thomas de Shelford [Shalford] succeeded 1294; resigned 1301
John de Greenstreet elected 1301; resigned 1314
Hamo de Hethe [Hythe] (58) elected 1314; resigned 1319
John de Westerham appointed 1320; died 1321
John de Speldhurst (59) elected 1321; resigned 1333
John de Sheppey (60) elected 1333; resigned 1351 (Rochester Episcopal Register I, f. 157)

[(54) Sacrist. Refused to assent to the sale of Chattenden Wood, Frindsbury; resigned and retired to Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire where he died (Wharton, op.cit. p.393)
(55) Sacrist. Resigned through ill health ( ibid )
(56) Said to have manipulated the election of John Bradfield as Bishop of Rochester in 1278. Accused of embezzlement and simony. He died on 7 January 1293/1294 ( ibid p.394)
(57) Bishop of Rochester 1292-1317
(58) Bishop of Rochester 1319-1352
(59) Cellarer
(60) Bishop of Rochester 1353-1360. Treasurer of England 1356-1360]

Robert de Suthflete [i.e. Southfleet] (61) succeeded 1352; died 1361
John de Hertlepe [Hartlip] (62) elected 1361; resigned 1380
John Sheppey (63) elected 1380; died 1419
William Tonebreg [Tonbridge] (64) elected 1419; died 1444/1445 (Rochester Episcopal Register III, f.203)
John Clyve [Cliffe] (65) elected 1445 ( ibid ); died 1460 ( ibid. f.233 verso)
Richard Peckham (66) elected 1460 ( ibid ); occurs 1463 (DRc/T336), 1467
William Wood (67) occurs 1468, 1470 (DRc/T301), 1472 (DRc/T288), 1475 (DRc/T281)
Thomas Bourne (68) occurs 1478 (DRc/Elb/1A/f.4), 1479, 1480, 1482, ( ibid f.10), 1486, 1488 (DRc/T104/1), 1489, 1492 (DRc/Elb/1A/f.16); resigned 1494 (Rochester Episcopal Register IV f.7)
William Bishop elected 1494 ( ibid ); resigned 1509 ( ibid. , f.53)
William Fresell (69) elected 1509 ( ibid ); died 1532 ( ibid., f.173)

[(61) Subdeacon 21 September 1325 (Rochester Episcopal Register I, f.69 verso); Deacon 26 January 1325/1326 ( ibid., f.71); priest 2 April 1327 ( ibid., f.76); resigned Office of chamberlain 17 September 1326 ( ibid., f.118); voted for John de Sheppey as prior 19 August 1333 ( ibid., f. 157); Warden of Felixstowe (Suffolk)
(62) Deacon 14 June 1348 ( ibid., f.237 verso); Warden of Felixstowe (Suffolk)
(63) Subdeacon 30 May 1364 ( ibid., f.327 verso); priest 19 September 1367 ( ibid., f.330 verso)
(64) Acolyte 24 September 1396 ( ibid. II., f.146 verso); Subdeacon 21 December 1398 ( ibid. f.196); priest 18 December 1400 ( ibid., f.156 verso)
(65) Subdeacon 23 September 1402 ( ibid., f.1810 verso); deacon 22 September 1403 ( ibid. III., f.37 verso) priest 29 March 1404 ( ibid. II, f.186 verso); cellarer 25 May 1425 ( ibid. III., f.47 verso)
(66) Professed c.7 September 1446 ( ibid. , f.207 verso); acolyte and subdeacon 17 December 1446 ( ibid. , f.209); priest 19 December 1450 ( ibid. f.220 verso)
(67) Subprior 10 September 1461 ( ibid. , f.234 verso)
(68) Acolyte 14 April 1458 ( ibid., f.231); subdeacon Easter Saturday 1460 ( ibid., f.233); deacon 19 September 1461 ( ibid., f.235 verso); priest 19 September 1461 ( ibid., f.236 verso)
(69) Prior of Binham, Norfolk. Professed at St. Albans (Hertfordshire) ( ibid., f.53). Probably the first non-local prior since the late twelfth century.]

Laurence Mereworth (70) elected 1532 ( ibid. ); resigned 1538
Walter Boxley (71) occurs 1538 (DRc/T164), 1539 (DRc/T282, DRc/335/1, 1540 (DRc/T335/4).

[(70) Deacon 8 March 1504/1505 ( ibid., f.41); resigned office of cellarer 2 December 1514 ( ibid.,f.72 verso); sacrist 2 December 1514 ( ibid., f.72 verso); resigned 20 November 1518 ( ibid., f.77 verso); cellarer 12 November 1518 ( ibid. ); removed and replaced 22 October 1522 ( ibid., f.108 verso); resigned 5 October 1526 ( ibid., f.134 verso); subprior 5 October 1526 ( ibid.); resigned 11 November 1532 ( ibid., f.174). Also known as Laurence Dann

(71) Professed 26 November 1514 ( ibid. , f.72); deacon 20 December 1522 ( ibid. , f.109); present at the election of Laurence Mereworth 1532 ( ibid. , f.173). Also known as Walter Phillips under which name he was appointed as the first Dean of Rochester.]


Date: n/a
Quantity: n/a


Result number 22 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/DRc_T066 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/ BA01_Foundation_Charters_Title_Deeds_and_Leases_c1090_1539/ 01_St_Andrews_Priory_Rochester_c1100_1526/ DRc_T066.html

Cathedral Priory of St. Andrew the Apostle, Rochester

Letters Patent of King Henry VII to the Prior and Convent of Rochester 1486 +

Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward IV 1472

A. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Henry III to the Prior and Convent of Rochester 1259

Quitclaim, on payment of one gold mark into the royal wardrobe at Canterbury, of all right and claim to the advowson of Hoo [St. Werburgh or Hundred] which Prior Simon [de Clyve/Cliffe] and convent of Rochester has obtained by exchange from the nuns of St. Suplice [de Rennes] in Britany, [France], and to which they had successfully defended their right against the king in his court.

The king at Canterbury [10] November 1259.**

+ This document does not appear to have been enrolled. From the hand and content it might be datable as either 1486 or 1510 as no indication is given as to which King Henry gave the Letters Patent.

** Part of the text has been damaged, but see C.P.R. King Henry III, volume V, P.62 from which the date has been supplied.

B. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward I to the Prior and Convent of Rochester 1275

1. Charter of King William [II] [1087 x 1100]*

2. Charter of King William [II] to ........** and all his ministers in Housak [c.1088 x 1094]***

Confirmation to St. Andrew's church, Rochester of land belonging to the reeve of Chatham which the monks have inclosed in their garden on condition that the monks sing masses, and that Bishop G[undulf] [i.e. Gundulf] gives other land of his own which is worth quarter of what the land was worth when the Bishop of Bayeux [Normandy, France] gave it to the monks.

Witnesses

Walkelin, Bishop [of Winchester]
Robert, Chancellor
Renulf, Chaplain

At Brigstoke [in Northamptonshire]

* Charters B1-3 are attributed to King William I in these letters patent. It may well be that B3 is a charter of King William I but B1 and 2 are certainly not. B1 is quoted in the inspeximus of King Henry III, 1265 as charter of King William II. B2 does not appear elsewhere but from internal evidence can be dated between about 1088 and 1094.

** Document damaged at this point.

*** Robert Bloet became Chancellor in about 1088 and remained in office until he was elevated to the see of Lincoln in 1094.

B.3.Charter King William I or II to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester [1066 x 1100]*

Order that the Church of St. Andrew in the City of Rochester shall have the customs which it had in the time of King Edward (the Confessor) in all its lands, annones and ports.

4. Charter of King William II [1087 x 1089]

5. Charter of King William II to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester [1087-1100]* *

Confirmation of St. Andrew's Church of the Church on the Royal Manor of Dartford which Robert, the King's Steward gave to the monks and which he and his son Hamo handed over to them in the King's presence.

Witnesses

Robert, Count of Mellent
Robert, Count of Montollio

6. Charter of King William II to the Bishop of Suffolk, the Sheriff and other Barons French [cf. France] and English [1087-1100]* *

Confirmation of St. Andrew's Church, Rochester of Roger Bigot's gift to St. Andrew's church of the Church of St. Felicity, Walton [in Felixstowe, Suffolk] with the tithes and all other things.

Witness

Eudo, the Steward at Winchester.

* King William I 1066-1087; King William II 1087-1100 ** King William II 1087-1100.

B.7 Charter of King Henry I [1123-1135]

8. Charter of King Henry I to Ansfrid, the Sheriff and other Barons French [cf. France] and English in Kent. [1128-1134]*

Gift to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester of Boxley Church with all its appurtenances in lands, tithes, oblations, rights, customs and liberties just as and better than ever Giffard, the King's Chaplain held it and Ansfrid the Clerk before that.

Witnesses

William [Corbois/Corbyl], Archbishop of Canterbury
Gilbert [Universalis], Bishop of London
Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln
Seifrid [Seffridus], Bishop of Chichester

At London

9. Charter of King Henry I to Archbishop A[nselm] [i.e. Anselm], Hamo, Sheriff and all other men of Kent and all Barons of England. [1100 x 1107]* *

Gift to Bishop Gundulf, the Church of St. Andrew and St. Paulinus, the Confessor and the monks of a two day fair in the City of Rochester on the eve and festival of St. Paulinus and all the issues therefrom inside and outside the City.

* Gilbert [Universalis], Bishop of London 1128-1134, a witness ** King Henry I 1100-1135; Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester died in 1107.

B.9 Witnesses

William Weyelimast
Eudo, the Steward
Hamo, the Steward
William Peverell
Hamo Peverel

10. Charter of King Henry I [1107 x 1109]

11. Charter of King Henry I to all his Barons and Officials [1100-1123]* *

Confirmation to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester of Soc and Sac toln and theam grithbrece hamsocne forstalles infangenethiof flemeneferme and other customs and liberties better than ever Christ Church, Canterbury held them in the times of the King, his father, the King, his brother and Archbishop Lanfranc.

The fourth penny from the toll of land and water in the City of Rochester, from the ferry when the bridge is broken, and from the whole hundred; and, saving the King's tax, one fourth part of the issues pertaining to the Constable of the City.

Witnesses

Robert [Bloet/Bluet], Bishop of Lincoln
Turc' de Guermon
Hamo, the Steward

At London

** King Henry I 1100-1135; Robert [Bloet/Bluet], Bishop of Lincoln died in 1123.

B.12 Charter of King Henry I to Hamo, the Steward and Hugh de Boch [1103-1107]*

Order forbidding any person to fish in the River Thames above the fishery of the monks of Rochester at Niwera. If any persons are found fishing there they shall be forfeit to the King.

Witness

Waldric, Chancellor at Westminster [Middlesex].

13. Charter of King Henry I to Archbishop A[nselm] [i.e. Anselm], Hamo, the Steward and all his Barons French [cf. France] and English in Kent. [1100-1107]* *

Confirmation to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester and Bishop Gundulf of Aylesford Church with the lands, tithes and other things; Sutton Church with all the tithes in annones, beasts, pasturage, mills and other things; Woolwich Church with all the tithes; half the Royal tithe of Strood and Chalk for the salvation of the souls of the King, his wife and his parents.

Witness

Eudo, the Steward at Rochester.

* Waldric became Chancellor in 1103 and remained in office until he was elevated to the see of Laon in 1107.
** King Henry I 1100-1135. The Charter is addressed to Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester and St. Andrew's Church [Rochester]. Gundulf died in 1107.

B14 Charter of King Henry I to Archbishop A[nselm] [i.e. Anselm], Hamo, the Steward and all his Barons French and English in Kent. [1100/1101]*

Confirmation to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester and Bishop Gundulf of Churches of Dartford and Aylesford with the Churches subject to them, and all the tithes of the vills where they are in annones, pasturage and money just as Saint Augustine held them in the time of his father; Milton Church with the tithes of the vill and the tithe of whales caught in the Bishopric of Rochester. Order that the said Saint, Bishop (Gundulf) and the monks shall have the Churches and tithes and hold them freely and quietly, and that no man shall harm them.

Witnesses

Richard [i.e. Rober Bloet/Bluet?], Bishop of Lincoln
William Giffard, Chancellor
Eudo, the Steward
Hamo, the Steward
William de Albinucio
William Pevrel of Dover

At Rochester 12 March.

* William Giffard was Chancellor to King William II and remained in office until about April 1101.

The King caused these writings to be exemplified under contd. his seal to minimise the danger to the Prior and Convent of Rochester for future time because the original documents were torn and their seals broken+.

Witness to the Letters Patent of King Edward I

Robert [Burnel], Bishop of Bath and Wells, Chancellor at Westminster [Middlesex] 10 November 1275.

C. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward I to the Prior and convent of Rochester 1275

1. Charter of King Stephen [1135 x 1154]

2. Charter of King Stephen to Ralph, son of Conus, the Sheriff of Kent and the justiciars and officials of Rochester to St. Andrew's church Rochester [1135-1139] ++

The Monks of St. Andrew's church, Rochester shall have their lands, tenures, and customs, and one fourth part of the rents of Rochester as well as ever they did in the time of King Henry on the day he died* and in the times of other Kings, his ancestors.

Witness

Robert, Chancellor at Rochester.

+ Nos igitur priori et monachis ecclesie predicte per rupturas scriptuarum predictarum seu sigillorum eis appensorum periculum minueat infuturum scriptures predictas sub sigillo nostro fecimus exemplari.

++ Robert le Poer, nephew of Robert le Poer, Bishop of Salisbury was Chancellor 1135-1139.

* in die qua fuit vivus et mortuus.

C.3 Charter of King Stephen to the King's officials in Merlana [1135-1154] **

Gift to the Bishop of Rochester of Ĺ virgate land in Merlana. No person shall harm him and if they do, the King's justice shall be done.

Witness

The Chancellor at Wallingford [in Berkshire].

4. Charter of KIng Henry II [1154-1189]

5. Charter of King Henry II [1174-1189]

6. Charter of King Richard I [1193]

7. Charter of King Richard I [1189-1194]

The same reason is given for the exemplification of these charters as under B.

Witness to the Letters Patent of Edward I

Robert [Burnel], Bishop of Bath and Wells, Chancellor at Westminster 10 November 1275.

D. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III to the Prior and convent of Rochester 1335

1. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Henry III 1265

a. Charter of King William II [1087-1089]

b. Charter of King Henry I [1123-1135]

c. Charter of King Henry I [1107-1109]

d. Charter of King Henry II [1174-1189]

** Stephen 1135-1154 e. Charter of King Richard I [1193]

f. Charter of King Richard I [1189-1194]

g. Charter of King Richard I 1197

D. Witnesses to the Letters Patent of King Edward III

J[ohn] [i.e. John de Stratford], Archbishop of Canterbury, Chancellor H[enry] [i.e. Henry de Burghersh], Bishop of Lincoln, Treasurer R[ichard] [i.e. Richard de Angarville, Aungervyle or de Bury], Bishop of Durham, John, Earl of Cornwall, the King's brother, John de Warenne [cf. Warinne], Earl of Surrey, Henry de Percy, Ralph de Nevill, Seneschal of the King's guesthouse

The King at Newcastle upon Tyne [Northumberland] 2 July 1335.

E. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III to the Prior and convent of Rochester 1335/6

1. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Henry III 1265

a. Charter of King William II [1087-1089]

b. Charter of King Henry I [1123-1135]

c. Charter of King Henry [1107-1109]

d. Charter of King Henry II [1174-1189]

e. Charter of King Henry II [1154-1189]

f. Charter of King Richard I [1193]

g. Charter of King Richard I [1189-1194]

h. Charter of King Richard I 1197

The Prior and convent of Rochester shall not be impeded in their enjoyment of the foregoing by reason of any non-user in the past.

Witnesses to the Letters Patent of King Edward III

J[ohn] [i. John de Stratford], Archbishop of Canterbury, Chancellor H[enry] [i.e. Henry de Burghersh], Bishop of Lincoln, Treasurer W[illiam] [i.e. William Ayremyn], Bishop of Norwich John, Earl of Cornwall, the King's brother John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, Richard, Earl of Arundel, Henry de Percy, William de Monte Acuto, Ralph de Nevill, Seneschal of the King's guesthouse

The King at Westminster [Middlesex] 16 March 1335/1336

F. Inspeximus of a charter of King Edward [I]+ to the Prior and convent of Rochester 1295

G. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III 1344

H. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III 1345

Special licence to the Prior and convent of Rochester to fortify and crenellate the wall of stone and chalk extending from the east gate of the city of Rochester to St. William's gate between the city and the garden belonging to the prior and convent, and to keep it crenellated without any interruption or impediment by the King, his heirs or their officials whatsoever forever.

The King at Westminster [Middlesex] 5 August 1345.

I. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III 1369

See DRc/T63 K. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III 1374

Special licence to Robert de Beleknappe, kt., notwithstanding the statute or mortmain, to give to the Prior and convent of Rochester his manor and Shawstead [cf. Sharsted] near.

+ This is given in the inspeximus as a charter of King Edward III but this cannot be the case as Anthony Bek/Beck, Bishop of Durham 1284-1311 appears as a witness.

Rochester, 23 acres land, 80 acres pasture and l acre wood in Chatham and Wouldham; and Ĺ the manor of Lidsing with its appurtenances, excepting 20 acres land on Shawstead manor held from the king as of the honour of Crevequore by military service, and 8 acres land on the same manor held from the King as of the honour of Leybourne.

Rent: 22 marks a year to be paid at Easter and Michaelmas in equal portions.

Conditions: 1. to find a monk to celebrate divine services every day in the cathedral church at Rochester according to an ordinance already made by Robert de Belcknappe

2. To do the due and customary services on behalf of Robert de Beleknappe [cf. Beleknap, Belknap, Belknappe, Belcknappe, Belkeneppe, Belkeneppe] and his heirs to the King, his heirs, and the chief lords of the fees for the manor of Shawstead and the land, pasture and wood, and half the manor of Lidsing [cf. Lydsing] forever.

The King at Eltham manor 28 December 1374.

L. Inspeximus of Letters patent of King Richard II 1393

Robert de Belknap, kt., deceased, by special licence obtained in this behalf from the King's grandfather, recently gave to Rochester priory the manor of Shawstead [cf. Sharsted] near Rochester with half the manor of Lidsing and other lands in Chatham and Wouldham, which, excepting 20 acres land on the manor of Shawstead as of the honour of Crevecoer, which honour the King's consort holds for life with reversion to the King and his heirs, and 8 acres land as of the honour of Leybourne, were being held from the Lord Edward, late King of England, the King's grandfather;

The residue of the same manor and of the other lands and tenements was being held from other persons as well as the king's grandfather. The monks were to pay the tent and abide by the conditions quoted under DRc/T66/1 K.

Afterwards Robert de Belknap, by special licence similarly obtained, released the priory from the payment of two out of 22 marks rent forever, and agreed to acquit and defend the property in respect of the king and any others lords of the fee.

Robert de Belknap was seized of this rent for 20 marks in demesne as of fee until, by forfeiture of the said Robert on pretext of a judgement against him in the king's court held at Westminster on the morrow of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the eleventh year of the king's reign (3 February 1387/1388), when the said rent of 20 marks and all the lands and tenements which belonged to Robert de Belknap were seized and forfeit into the king's hands.

After that the king, by his letters patent, gave the rent of 20 marks to John Scarle and his heirs; he subsequently gave it to William Kanenade, Thomas Chiche of Balverle, Thomas Brockhull, Stephen de Betenham, Stephen Paytewyn and William Every and the heirs of William Makenade. After the death of Thomas Chiche, Thomas Brockfull, Stephen de Batenham, Stephen Paytewyn and William Every released all their right to the rent to William Makenade and his heirs. Later William Makenade gave it to Gilbert Manfeld, citizen of London, Thomas Brockhull, Stephen de Betenham and Stephen Paytewyn for the life of William Makenade and with reversion to himself and his heirs as the king understands.

Special licence to William Makenade to concede that after his death the rent of 20 marks shall remain to Rochester priory for the maintenance of one monk to celebrate divine services in the priory, and for other divine services to be performed annually by the Prior and convent and their successors for the souls of William Makenade, his parents and friends, and all the faithful departed according to an ordinance made for this purpose by William Makenade forever.

Special licence to the Prior and convent of Rochester that after the death of William Makenade they may forever take and keep the rent of 20 marks and, notwithstanding the statute of mortmain, the manor of Shawstead [cf. Sharsted] excepting those things already excepted which are held from the same manor by the king's consort.

The king forbade that William Makenade and his heirs and the Prior and convent and their successors should by reason of these premises, by interrupted, annoyed or molested in any way by himself, his heirs, justiciars, escheators, sheriffs, bailiffs or other officials or their heirs whatsoever saving only to the king and his heirs and the chief lords of the fee the services due and customary.

The king at Canterbury 29 May 1393.

Inspeximus of Letters Patent of KIng Richard II

Restatement of the proceedings as far as the second paragraph of DRc/T66/1 L above.

Confirmation of Robert de Beleknap's release to the Prior and convent and their successors forever from the payment of 2 of the 22 marks a year rent which they pay him for the property they hold of him. Agreement to acquit and defend the property in respect of the chief lords of the fee.

Repeat of the last paragraph of DRc/T66/1 l.

The king at Westminster [Middlesex] 1 December 1382.

Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Richard II

With the assent of his Council, the king gave John Scarle a rent of 20 marks issuing out of the manor of Shawstead [cf. Sharsetd], half the manor of Lidsing [cf. Lydsing] and other lands and tenements in Chatham and Wouldham which belonged to Robert de Bealknap, kt. which he had and took from the Prior and convent of Rochester and which came into the king's hands by forfeit of the said Robert by virtue of a judgement against him in the last Parliament held at Westminster, Middlesex.

John Scarle and his assigns shall have the rent forever on payment of 200 marks at the receipt of the king's exchequer on terms which may be agreed between John Scarle and the treasurer.

So that if the annual rent of any part of it had to be recovered from John Scarle and his assigns by process of law without fraud of evil practice, the king wished that John Scarle, his heirs and assigns should be compensated by the king and his heirs to the value of the amount it happened to be necessary to recover.

The king at Westminster, Middlesex 5 August 1388.

Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Richard II

Special licence to the Prior and convent of Rochester that they may acquire priories, manors, lands tenements, rents, services and knights fees with their appurtenances, advowsons of churches, both those which are being held for their own use as well as others, and other possessions of the abbies, priories and other foreign religious persons from the realm of France in the kingdom and in the king's hands by reason of the war between the English and the French [cf. France] or the schism of the French, or other lands, tenements, rents and advowsons of churches to the value of 100 marks a year for themselves and their successors forever.

The churches acquired from the possessions of aliens which are being held for their own use may be transferred in and to the Prior and convent of Rochester and their house as well as may be; otherwise the union or appropriation of those churches made to the abbots, priors or foreign religious persons shall be absolutely dissolved and they shall be newly appropriated, joined and incorporated to the Prior and convent of Rochester and their house for their own use forever to keep the king's obit after his death and the obit of Anne, late queen of England, decreased, each year, the statute of mortmain notwithstanding, or any other statute or ordinance to the contrary; and notwithstanding that the priories, manors, demesnes, lands, tenements, rents, services, fees, advowsons of churches and possessions of the aforesaid foreigners are in the king's hand by reason of the war of the schism of the French [cf. France], or are being held from the king in chief, or of the king's gift or by collation of his progenitors; and notwithstanding that they were given to the aforesaid abbots, priors or alien religious persons or their predecessors by the king's progenitors, to found or maintain chantries, hospitals, works of charity and for other purposes; notwithstanding any cause or material reason whatever which touches or may touch the king or his heirs in the future.

In the meantime, however, let it be ascertained by inquisitions taken in this behalf and returnable in the usual way into the king's chancery or his heirs' that the acquisition of these other lands, tenements, rents and advowsons may be effected without damage or prejudice to the king, his heirs or any other persons whatsoever.

The king at Margam Abbey (in Glamorganshire, Wales) 10 September 1394.

The inspeximus of King Edward IV was witnessed by the king at Westminster, Middlesex 12 November 1472.

The Letters Patent of King Henry VII were witnessed by the king at Westminster, Middlesex 19 April 1486.

There are no endorsements on this document but there are various hands and comments drawn or written in the margins of the first four of the five membranes drawing attention to particular points. This was probably done by Martin Cotes, Chapter Clerk 1547-1605.

At the base of the charter on the final membrane is written pro sex marcis solutis in Hanaperio and on the turned up edge
Examinatur per Johannem yong et ) clericos
Examinatur per Jacobum Whitstons ) clericos

The charter is also inscribed Whitstons indicating that he wrote it up.

The seal has gone but was originally attached to the document by means of a plait of green and white silk and two metal threads which is more or less entire. It extends 17 inches from the base of the document. The metal thread is of uneven width varying from 1-2 mm and has been would round a length of fine string before being plaited in.

The document is undecorated in any way although it was obviously intended that it should be as spaces have been left for the initial letter H and other letters along the top line. The word inspeximus has been enlarged at various points in the text for ease of finding the beginnings of the many charters inspected.

Latin.
Date: 1486 +
Quantity: 1 item


Result number 23 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/DRc_L37 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/ BA04_Legal_Records_1096_1535/ 03_Newark_Hospital_Strood_1193_1535/ DRc_L37.html

Roll of Pleas and Inquisitions 1329-1343

1. Pleas before the Barons of the Exchequer on the quindene of the purification for pardon from taxation on the excuse that Strood hospital holds no lands in the city or liberties of Rochester 1329

Order to the assessors 27 June 1329 that Strood hospital is exempted from payment of 20s. as assessed for the year 32 +, and to return any goods taken in distraint.

Witness: John de Stonore [cf. Stonor] at Westminster [Middlesex] and entered on the great roll for year 2.

A copy of this record, which was written by Edmund de Casterton, clerk, was delivered to Richard de Cestre [cf. Chester], clerk William de Everdone and brother Roger de Stowe, Master of Strood hospital on Saturday 1 July 1329.

2. Petition ++ to the King's council at Canterbury asking that Strood hospital might be exempted from contributing towards the support of 2 piers of Rochester bridge and from payment of the triennial 15th and biennial 9th as otherwise they must neglect the poor for whom they are obliged to provide, and also the charity founded for the souls of the king [Edward III] and queen [Philippa of Hainault/Hainhault] and their ancestors for whom they must pray. 7 November 1340.

Order to the assessors 6 November [?1340] that Strood hospital is exempted from payment of the 9th of sheaves of corn, and of lambs and calves, and to return any goods taken in distraint*

Witness: The ? Justice of the Peace** at Reading [Berkshire].

3. Inquisition held before John de Vielstone, king's eschaetor in Kent when the furors swore on oath that Strood hospital lay in the Hundred of Shamwell and owned no property in the Hundred of Rochester. 20 May 1343.

+ ? 1303/1304
+ in French [cf. France]
* No mention is made of their obligation to contribute to the bridge at Rochester so presumably they still had to pay. The order is dated the day before the petition was read. This may be a mistake.
** Teste Custode apud Redyng [i.e. Reading, Berkshire]. Jurors:

John de Eldeham [cf. Yaldham], Geofrey Derby, Walter Webbe [cf. Webb], Robert de Eldeham [cf. Yaldham], John de Maydestane [cf. Maidstone], Robert Lucas, Richard Edmund, William Karewey, Peter ate Pette [cf. Pett], Benedict le Man, Hugh le Taylour [cf. Teylour, Taillur, Taillour, Teylur, Tayllour, Taylur], Nicholas Robyn [cf. Robin], Robert Godet, William de Gyllyngham [cf. Gillingham], John Marchaunt at Strood.

Endorsement:
Nota quod dicunt per sacramentum quod domus hospitalis est super hundredo de Schamele [i.e. Shamwell] et non de Roff' [i.e. Rochester] [14th. century]

Document torn at one end and for the most part only easily legible under ulta-violet light.

Latin/French [cf. France].
Date: 1329, 1340, 1343
Quantity: 1 membrane


Result number 24 - Please quote Reference: P296_RAINHAM_1517_1987/P296_06C_05 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Rochester_Archdeaconry_Area_Parishes/ P296_RAINHAM_1517_1987/ 02_ADDITIONAL_DEPOSIT_1864_1987/ 06_CHURCHWARDENS_Property_1897_1976/ P296_06C_05.html

Rainham parish records

Churchwardens, churchyard

Memoranda and letters from Commonwealth War Graves Commission (Maidenhead, Berkshire and Brookwood, Surrey) and Rochester Diocesan Office, to Rev. R. Allington-Smith of Rainham vicarage, concerning administration of War Graves in Rainham churchyard and general churchuard administration.

File updated by Borough Archivist 2 October 2001.

Date: c.1975 - c.1976
Quantity: 1 bundle/13 items
Result number 25 - Please quote Reference: Medway_Council_1997_Date/MTC_ED_EDNR_01 on request slip.

Path: Local_Government_Authorities_1227_Date/ Medway_Council_1997_Date/ Development_and_Environment_Department/ Economic_Development_and_Neighbourhood_Renewal_Division/ MTC_ED_EDNR_01.html

Economic Development and Neighbourhood Renewal Division, Economic Development Department, Medway Council, Municipal Buildings, Canterbury Street, Gillingham.

Printed, spiral-bound booklet entitled Rochester Airfield review project: assessment of land use options, report on public consultation W.S. Atkins Consultants Ltd., Berkshire House, 168-173 High Holborn, London WC1 for Medway Council.

Accession no.: MTC/MR/83

Date: March 2001
Quantity: 1 volume
Text version | Accessibility help | Home