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Result number 1 - Please quote Reference: 05_DE_SERIES_0501_0750/DE0646 on request slip.

Path: Accessions/ 05_DE_SERIES_0501_0750/ DE0646.html

Naval or military Letter of Attorney of John Pryer of General Cornwall’s Regiment of Marines at Rochester in favour of his sister Jane Coward, wife of John Coward of Devizes, Wiltshire, cordwainer, witnessed by R. Curtis, Mayor of Rochester and Richard Parry
Date: 1747
Quantity: 1 item
Result number 2 - Please quote Reference: 06_DE_SERIES_0751_1000/DE0933 on request slip.

Path: Accessions/ 06_DE_SERIES_0751_1000/ DE0933.html

Records transferred from Guildhall Museum,Rochester,ephemera series:Ticket for opening of Thames and Medway Canal, (1 item, card);Historical notes on Cliffe by PR. Payne, 1980 (file) [NB accompanying docket mentioned associated photographs, presumed now in Local Studies Unit];Typescript dissertation:Enforcement of Law and Order in the Medway Towns during the Nineteenth Century by Hazel E. Rapley, Sittingbourne College of Education, illustrated with photo of Rochester Gaol House under demolition 1970, compiled c.1970,  (1 folder);Curator's misc. correspondence re:Chatham history including Royal Marines, Theatre Royal, Chatham Barracks, Rome House, Chatham Town Hall and Royal Engineers [1972] 1988-1998 (1 folder);Typescript extract from Weller Collection at Centre for Kentish Studies (reference U38 Z1) comprising notes on incorporating part of Chatham into Rochester and mentioning Chatham Market, original notes 1710, transcribed 1987 (1 sheaf);Press releases, brochures and correspondence with curator of Eastgate House Museum,  Rochester about Medway Dutch Week 1967 (1 folder) ;Photocopied typescript notes on the map of the River Medway between St. Mary's Creek, Gillingham and Rochester Bridge at Alnwick Castle, Northumberland of 1633, compiled c.1980 (1 sheaf);letter from Dr. H.L. Lehmann FRIC, to Ml Moad, curator of the Guildhall Museum, Rochester, concerning the Alnwick Map and attaching a typescript translation of William Schellinks' description of a journey through Rochester to London from Travels in England 1661-1663, 1989 (1 sheaf);Typed articles on the Alnwick Map by Ml Moad, curator of the Guildhall Museum,1998 (1 sheaf);Correspondence between curatorial staff of Guildhall Museum, Rochester and interested parties concerning preservation of Alnwick Map 1982-1998 (1 packet) [closed for 30 years];Photocopy of  of letter from Dr. S. I. Pritchett  local Medical Officer of Health, to his sister Nellie [-], describing German bombing raids over Kent 3-6 September 1917, 6 September 1917, with covering correspondence 1977 [cf. Germany] (1 sheaf);Certificates of official recognition granted by the Admiralty, War Office and Air Ministry to affiliated voluntary organisations recognising the Mayor and Mayoress of Gillingham's Comforts Fund 1940 and 1941 (2 items, card);Printed circular from W.R. Death of Brompton advertising new shawls etc 21 April 1851 (1p.);Photocopy notes on local authority's civic regalia, typescript note of dimensions of local authority charters 1438-1974, photograph of charter of King Charles I to Rochester Corporation 7 August 1629 (1 item) and three photos of vote of thanks from Rochester Corporation to Prince and Prince Arthur of Connaught on occasion of their visit, dated 28 June 1927 (3 items, 2 mounted);Copy of notes and extracts from local authors on Halling Palace, compiled c.1980 (1 packet);Correspondence between Tom Hogarth, Director of Recreation, Medway BC and others organising visit by Lord Mayor of London to Upnor Stone and Admiral's Cruise, 1980 (1 folder);Photograph of safe conduct for ship Le Jonas of Cherbourg, France freighted with cargo belonging to Randolph Cenamy of Rouen, Normandy/Seine Maritime, France, merchant bound for Andalusia, Spain also to take on cargo of almonds and raisins at Malaga for London, dated at Rochester 15 August 1587, signed by Henry of Navarre with covering letter from Robson Lowe of Christie's, 47 Duke Street, London SW1 to M Moad, curator of Guildhall Museum, describing voyage of vessel in further detail 1985 (1 packet);Photocopies of curator's notes on proposed interpretive displays at Rochester Castle with c.1990 (1 packet););Photocopy of  collecting policy of Chatham Historic Dockyard Trust with covering letter from R.M. Holdsworth to Michael Moad, curator of Guildhall Museum, High Street, Rochester 1996 (1 sheaf);Letter from passengers of RMS Packet Medway off The Lizard, Cornwall to Commander H. Smith Esq., Merchant Navy, commending his actions in weathering a transatlantic storm and his efforts in saving the passengers of Isis which had joined them at Nassau, West Indies, signatories including A. Melville, William Legoud, Jose Joaqim de Arrieta, Douglas and Peter Muter, C.W. Allain, Mascie D. Taylor and Eliza (Elizer) Montefiore, 3 November 1842 with typed transcription by curatorial staff of eastgate House Museum,  Rochester [NB erroneous] c.1960 (2pp.);Typescript copy of report of Captain H.C. Lockyer, Royal Navy (RN) commanding officer of HMS Implacable describing operations off Gallipoli Peninsula, Dardanelles, Turkey 24-26 April 1915 (9pp.) with two small watercolours of HMS Implacable passing Sedd-ul-Bahr, Turkey and at entrance to Dardanelles 8 April 1915 (2 items, paper mounted on card);Off-print entitled HM Armed Vessel Bounty by C. Knight of Gillingham 1936 and off-print entitled HM Bark Endeavour by same, reproduced from The Mariner's Mirror 1933 (2 items);MS notes on HMS Bellerephon by a Miss A. Butler, 1970 (2pp.);Correspondence between M Moad, curator of Guildhall Museum, Rochester and Captain Joseph R. McLeary, United States Navy (USN), US Naval Attache, US Embassy, London, enquiring about Mary Ross's shipyard in Rochester and site of building of HMS Epervier in 1812, 1989 (2pp.);Typescript histories of warships named HMS Rochester (1 sheaf) c.1950 (1 sheaf);Copy of letter from K R. Gulvin, Vice Chairman, Fort Amherst and Lines Trust, Fort Amherst,  Chatham to Councillor J Shaw, asking for council intervention to delay breaking-up of HMS Chysanthemum, moored in the River Medway, with covering note from P Fisher, City Secretary, to M Moad, curator of Guildhall Museum,  1995 (2pp.)Updated: May 2016.

Please request individual items on request slip- entire box will not be produced 


Date: [1587] 1842-1998
Quantity: 1 box
Result number 3 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_Aob_118 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB01_Administrative_Records_1541_1968/ 23_DRc_Aob_Appointments_of_Beadsmen_or_Almsmen_1545_to_1926/ DRc_Aob_118.html

Appointments of Beadsmen or Almsmen

Certificate from minister and churchwardens of Mawnan, Cornwall that James Downing is in perfect health.

See DRc/Aob 25 1728
Date: 1 October 1728
Quantity: 1p.


Result number 4 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTb_014 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 01_DRc_FTb_Treasurers_books_1548_to_1913/ DRc_FTb_014.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester

 

Finance records: treasurer  Treasurers' books (DRc/FTb )

 

 

Treasurer's book - Henry Ullock.

 

Includes 6d paid to a Frenchman [cf. France] a Protestant by certificate 29 March 1678

 

Includes 6d paid to two poor travellers which were in slavery at Algiers, Algeria, Africa [cf. Barbary] by pass of the mayor of Falmouth, Cornwall 11 April 1678

 

Includes 1s 6d relief paid to two poor gentlewomen, inhabitants of Cannon [sic,] Ireland (one of their husbands being in slavery in Turkey) travelling to Dover with their families 28 May 1678

 

Includes 1s paid for the relief of one St. John and his wife and family, travellers by pass from the justices of the peace of Ballynafeigh [?] (Bellaniefoy) [Belfast, Antrim] in the province of Ulster, Ireland who were burnt out of all they had 6 July 1678

 

Includes 6d paid for the relief of a poor sick man who came from Greenhithe to Rochester to be cured of the scurvy and consumption 29 July 1678

 

Includes 1s 6d paid to Captain John Gray and his lieutenant and a son of his (who were burnt out of Breda [Holland/Netherlands] by the French [cf. France]), travellers by pass, 15 October 1678

 

Includes 1s paid to a poor traveller who came out of New England [cf. America] travelling to Bedfordshire by pass from Canterbury, 17 October 1678

 

Includes 1 s paid to two French Protestants who had a testimonial from Dr. Brevall and several other testimonials, 18 Ovtober 1678

 

Includes 5s paid to Jachino Cecilliano, abbot of Cephalonia [cf. Kephalonia], Greece by Dr. Dixon's order, 30 October 1678

 

Includes 1s paid to Jeremy Hogan a Scotchman [cf. Scotland] a lieutenant to the Dutch [cf. Holland/Netherlands] and taken prisoner by the French [cf. France], his wife and two children, travellers by pass from the mayor of Dover, 2 November 1678

 

Includes 4s paid for the relief of Captain Price and William Lynch poor prisoners in the Dolphin at Rochester, by Dr. Dixon's order, 11 November 1678

 

Includes 1s paid to a poor traveller, a minister's son, who was a prisoner in the Fleet Prison, London, 9 December 1678

 

Includes 1 s paid to a Welsh [cf. Wales] gentlewoman who was burnt out of her habitation in Monmouthshire, 11 December 1678

 

Latin and English

 

Bound and wrapped in a fragment of a mortgage between Edward Godfry [cf. Godfrey] of St. James in the Isle of Grain, yeoman and Reginald Rich [of ], in respect of at least 7 acres land named Beacon Field and [W]oodsfield and messuage[s] in Grain, consideration £100 term 500 years, 1654

Date: 1677-1678
Quantity: 1 booklet
Result number 5 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTb_024 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 01_DRc_FTb_Treasurers_books_1548_to_1913/ DRc_FTb_024.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester

  Finance records: Treasurers' books (DRc/FTb )

Giving lists of names and signatures of recipients arranged under headings as per cathedral officers, canons, prebends, choristers, paupers [beadsmen?] and pupils of the Cathedral Grammar School.

 

Treasurer's book - Henry Ullock

 

Includes 2s 6d given to Robert Carquis a poor French [cf. France] Protestant with two others of the same nation and religion, 9 January 1689

 

Includes 6d given to John Stephen a madman, 28 March 1689

 

Includes 1s given to Thomas Bale a poor distressed Irishman, 25 April [?] 1689

 

Includes 2s given to Samuel Coldwell that was forced from his living by debt, 20 July 1689

 

Includes 6d given to a poor seaman cast away at the Land's End [Cornwall], 26 August 1689

 

Includes 2s given to James Chariere, another French Protestant, 24 September 1689

 

Includes 1s given to three Irish [cf. Ireland] Protestants, 15 October 1689.

 

Latin and English.

Date: 1688-1689
Quantity: 1 volume
Result number 6 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTb_048 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 01_DRc_FTb_Treasurers_books_1548_to_1913/ DRc_FTb_048.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester    Finance records: Treasurers' books (DRc/FTb )

 

  Giving lists of names and signatures of recipients arranged under headings as per cathedral officers, canons, prebends, choristers, paupers [beadsmen?] and pupils of the Cathedral Grammar School.

 

Treasurer's book - Edmund Barrell.

 

Includes expenses: paid Mr. Whitledge bookseller, by the hands of Robin Bayley [cf. Bailey], carrier, two pounds eighteen shillings and eight pence for Dr. Gibson's Codex Juris Eccles[iastici Anglicani] bound in 2 volumes and lettered at the back, 6 February 1714

 

Includes expenses: given to Mr. Hughes, (secretary to the Office of Ordnance] two guineas for his advice in the affair of the church's estate in Chatham within the lines of fortification, 19 July 1714

 

Includes 1s alms given to one redeemed from slavery, 28 December 1713

 

Includes 6d alms given to one John Steward [cf. Stewart, Stuart] shipwrecked on the Irish coast [cf. Ireland], 24 January 1714

 

Includes 1s alms given to 2 poor sailors that had been cast away upon the coast of Penzance in the county of Cornwall, 2 February 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to a poor woman with a sore breast, 19 March 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to a poor sailor cast away upon the Scilly (Silly) Isles [Cornwall], 30 March 1714

 

Includes 2s 6d alms given to John Sheaf [cf. Sheafe] and William Filles towards paying their fees and releasing them out of prison, after their being acquitted of the robbery they were tried for, 30 March 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to a poor fellow disturbed in his mind, 31 March 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to David Walter a poor blind soldier, 6 April 1714

 

Includes 6d alms paid to 2 disbanded soldiers with a pass from Gibraltar, 16 April 1714

 

Includes 5s alms given to Charles Arnott [cf. Arnot] son of Dr. Arnott, who lived in Canterbury, towards paying his prison fees, 26 April 1714

 

Includes 2s 6d alms given to one Thomas Howard, a poor maimed soldier of a broken regiment in Spain, 30 April 1714

 

Includes 2s 6d alms given to one John Wheatley of Cranbourne a poor sufferer by fire, 11 May 1714

 

Includes 1s alms given to one Don Francisco Cheras a Spaniard [cf. Spain], that had been cast away on the coast of England, 27 July 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to Thomas Fowler and John Brown that had been taken by a Sally [cf. Algiers, Algeria, Africa, Barbary] man of war, and retaken by a Dutch man [of war], 23 August 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to one Thomas Johnson with a pass for Denmark, his native country, 23 September 1714

 

Includes 5s alms given to one Mr. Freeman Williamson, bachelor of arts, a great object of charity, 8 October 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to one Alexander Gordon, a North Briton [cf. Scotland] that had been cast away, 28 October 1714

 

Includes various sums given to George Roben, Henry Tudor, John Ashington, James Wakelin, Daniel Jackson and John Edwards and several others that were cast away homewards bound from the West Indies, 6 November 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to one Anne Wood, going by the name of the Fairy Queen, 13 November 1714

 

Includes 5s alms given to Mr. Hugh Pugh (Pughe) a poor minister from Herefordshire, and a great object of charity, 18 November 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to one John Boacham, Levite Thomas and others that had been cast away coming from the West Indies, 18 November 1714

 

Includes 6d alms given to one William Hamerstone and others with a pass from Dartmouth [Devon], 30 November 1714

 

Includes 1s alms given to William Froget [cf. Frogett, Frogatt] and James Smith 2 poor maimed soldiers from Port Mahon [Minorca, cf. Spain, Balearic Islands, Mediterranean], 11 December 1714

 

Includes alms given to numerous returning disbanded, discharged, maimed, sick and poor soldiers and seamen, many named and persons released from slavery in Turkey.

 

Latin and English.

 

File updated by borough archivist 13 August 2002.

Date: 1713-1714
Quantity: 1 booklet
Result number 7 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTb_050 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 01_DRc_FTb_Treasurers_books_1548_to_1913/ DRc_FTb_050.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester    Finance records: Treasurers' books (DRc/FTb )

 

 

Giving lists of names and signatures of recipients arranged under headings as per cathedral officers, canons, prebends, choristers, paupers [beadsmen?] and pupils of the Cathedral Grammar School.

 

Treasurer's book - John Grant.

 

Includes expenses: memorandum concerning removal of the church's arms to the chapter house, 2 May 1716

 

Includes expenses: received of Mr. Hill, deputy treasurer ten shillings for ringing on the thanksgiving day. For the blessing of God upon His Majesty's councils and arms in suppressing the late unnatural [Jacobite] rebellion; received I say the said sum by me, John Osmotherly, 8 June 1716

 

Includes expenses: to Mr. Robinson of Strood, bookbinder ten shillings for mending the church Bible; and five for his expenses in going to London to seek for a Book fit for the church; which though he could not find 'twas thought but reasonable to pay him his charges in going to look for it, 21 July 1716

 

Includes 1s alms given to Thomas Friar of Lidsing (Lidgeon) [cf. Lydsing] in the county of Kent, 30 December 1715

 

Includes 1s alms given to William Wills and James Barton 2 poor sea boys that had been cast away, and set on shore at Reculver, 15 January 1716

 

Includes 1s alms given to John Williams that had been taken by the Algerines [cf. Algeria, Sally, Algiers, Barbary, Africa], 24 January 1716

 

Includes 1s alms given to one Thomas Hikfield [cf. Hickfield], that had served in Lord Windsor's Regiment, 12 June 1716

 

Includes 1s alms given to John Mills, a Turkey slave from Tunis [cf. Tunisia, Africa, Barbary]

 

Includes 4s alms given to 4 poor Palatine [cf. Palatinate, Germany] women with 4 little children, 21 June 1716

 

Includes 5s alms given by order of the chapter to John Ballard of Cranbrook, a sufferer by fire, 11 July 1716

 

Includes 1s alms given to Robert Stout and John Boules with a pass from Algiers [cf. Sally, Algeria, Africa, Barbary] signed by William Thomson, consul, 16 August 1716

 

Includes 2s alms given to Henry Sheridon [cf. Sheridan] and John Price 2 poor Algerine [cf. Algiers, Sally, Algeria, Africa, Barbary] slaves, 30 August 1716

 

Includes 1s alms given to Thomas Stevens and John Mills with a pass from St. Ives (St. Jives) in Cornwall (Cornwell), 11 October 1716

 

Includes 6d alms given to Lawrence Sword a Scotchman (Scotheman) [cf. Scotland], 15 October 1716

 

Includes 1s alms given to the prisoners in Rooke's jail, 20 October 1716

 

Includes 3s alms given to Mary Bartlet [cf. Bartlett] with 5 children, with a pass from Minehead (Minhead) in Somerset-shire, 26 October 1716

 

Including 6d alms given to James Cross from the hospital in Ghent [cf. Belgium, Flanders], , 26 October 1716

 

Includes 5s alms given to Thomas Bright of the parish of Bethersden a poor sufferer by fire, 9 November 1716

 

Includes 1s alms given to 4 poor Algerine [cf. Algiers, Sally, Algeria, Africa, Barbary] slaves, viz. James Hooe [?], James Harrison, Richard Jones and William Lewis, with a pass from Leghorn [cf. Livorno, Tuscany, Italy], 17 November 1716

 

Includes 2s alms given to one Thomas Bowles a poor scholar from Dublin [Ireland], 28 November 1716

 

Latin and French.

Date: 1715-1716
Quantity: 1 booklet
Result number 8 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTb_055 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 01_DRc_FTb_Treasurers_books_1548_to_1913/ DRc_FTb_055.html

Dean and Chapter of Rochester

Finance records: treasurer

Treasurers' books 1548-1913 (DRc/FTb 1-243)

Each book is as a general rule divided up as follows: salaries paid to the Dean, prebendaries, minor canons, lay readers, choirmaster, organist, choristers, King's scholars, officers, stewards, counsellor, bailiff, and other church officers; the royal subsidy and annuity; pensions to the clergy; episcopal fees (exenia); alms; reparations to the fabric of the cathedral; exhibitions for King's scholars; expenses at law: extraordinary expenses and highway repair; necessaries; wood for fuel; carriage; and other items.

Giving lists of names and signatures of recipients arranged under headings as per cathedral officers, canons, prebends, choristers, paupers [beadsmen?] and pupils of the Cathedral Grammar School.

Treasurer's book - Edmund Barrell.

Includes expenses for restoration of cathedral, p.43

Includes 8s alms given to Mary Nicholson, who with her husband and 5 children (homeward bound from Ireland) were cast away; she and her 5 children were preserved by a ship in company with them and set on shore at Whitehaven [Cumberland]; and to Edward Howard and his wife with a young child in her arms; eight shillings to them all, 3 December 1720

Includes 2s alms given to six poor French sailors, viz. Philip Freman, Nicholas Oraie, Laurence Adam, Giles Buy, John Lenoir and Tarquin Vincent, 3 December 1720

Includes 3s alms given to Rebecca Jones, and her sister Anne Bannister with four children, cast away in their passage to Boston in [Massachusetts] New England, and in a very distressed condition, with a pass from Topsham in the county of Cornwall (Cornwell) [sic, i.e. Devon], 9 December 1720

Includes 1s alms given to Francis Richard, a poor Switzer [i.e. Swiss; cf. Switzerland], with his wife Magdalene, 11 January 1721

Includes 1s alms given to one Peter Bruckner, a poor scholar, with a testimonium [cf. testimonial] from Basel (Basil) [cf. Basle] in Switzerland, 14 February 1721

Includes 2s 6d alms given to Frederick Burgeois with a testimonium from the pastors of Basel (Basil) [cf. Basle] in Switzerland, 23 February 1721

Includes 1s alms given to Peter Steward [cf. Stewart, Stuart] and John Steward that had been slaves 3 years in Barbary [cf. Africa, Algiers, Algeria, Sally], 12 May 1721

Includes 1s 6d alms given to 6 Frenchmen shipwrecked on the coast of Ireland with a pass signed Chammord, who took care of the affairs of France at the court of England, 13 June 1721

Includes 6d alms given to Richard Wilson, a poor sailor, that had been taken by a privateer and being turned adrift, was fortunately taken into a ship that came by, and set on shore, 20 May 1721

Includes 1s alms given to 2 Arabians [cf. Arabs, Arabia] that had been taken by the Algerines [cf. Algiers, Sally, Algeria, Barbary, Africa], 5 August 1721

Includes 6d alms given to one John Andrews with a pass from Brussels; signed William Leathes, His Majesty's Resident at Brussels [Belgium], 14 August 1721

Includes 6d alms given to William Redfern of Ashford in the parish of Bakewell in Derbyshire who coming into Kent for harvest-work, fell sick, and was disabled to work, 13 September 1721

Includes 6d alms given to Antonio Fristo with a pass from Hastings in Sussex, 20 September 1721

Includes 2s 6d alms given to John Richardson, a poor scholar, formerly of Harthall in Oxford [Oxfordshire], 5 October 1721

Includes 2s 6d alms given to one in the habit of a gentleman, who applied to me with a paper subscribed after this manner: ego Don Antonius Feducia, et agliati, nobilis eques miles ex insula Malte [cf. Malta, Melita] venio ad supplicandum vestram revertiam, etc., 5 October 1721

Includes 2s 6d alms given to 2 poor women and 2 small children from Frankfurt (Frankford) in Germany, in a very wretched, poor condition, 13 October 1721

Includes 2s 6d alms given to Josepho Segaldo, an Italian [cf. Italy] and a valet de chambre [archivist's italics] who was left sick here in England by his master, 2 November 1721

Includes 2s 6d alms given to John Turner, rector of Coverham [North Riding, Yorkshire], in a very poor condition, 18 November 1721

Latin and English.

File updated by Borough Archivist, Medway Council 16 July 2001.

Date: 1720-1721
Quantity: 1 booklet/65pp. used
Result number 9 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTv_058 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 02_DRc_FTv_Bills_and_vouchers_1552_to_1867/ DRc_FTv_058.html

Treasurer's bills and vouchers 1552-1867 (DRc/FTv 1-231)

Treasurer's Vouchers, comprising beadsmen's receipts, receipts for payment of bishop's Xenium for visitation, bills for tradesmen’s work, bills for liturgical and sacramental supplies, bills for candles and tapers, bills for stationery, bills for giving of sermons, lists of quitrents and tenants, receipts for litigation and legal opinions, receipts for payments of tax, receipts for water supplies, parish clergy pension receipts, receipts for alms disbursed, receipts for apprenticeship agreements for children apprenticed out by the Dean and Chapter, receipts for officers' salaries and maintenance of children in the care of the cathedral.

Also includes bills passed for payment by John Hales for tradesmen and laboureres' work on Minor Canon Row, Rochester passim.

Includes receipts from Joseph Langley [cf. Longley, Lanley], bricklayer, for payment for building Minor Canon Row, 1722 (DRc FTv/58/1-9);

Includes bills from tradesmen approved by John Hales and passed to treasurer for payment, tradesmen including Henry Butler, labourer, for demolishing the high wall that stood by the tower (DRc FTv/58/11) and John Martin, brick merchant for bricks, both settled 29 June 1722 (DRc FTv/58/13), (DRc FTv/58/10-13);

Includes bills chiefly for nursing the widow Gamball in her time of illness, 1722 (DRc FTv/58/18-28);

Includes bill from John Letchford [cf. Latchford] of Halling for 10,000 bricks, settled 20 April 1722 (DRc FTv/99/32)

Includes bill from Thomas Jorden [cf. Jordan] for timber for Minor Canon Row, settled 26 May 1722 (DRc FTv/99/34)

Includes bills from John Gamball, cathedral bricklayer, for his labourers' work, February 1721/1722 (DRc FTv/99/37-41)

Includes bill from Daniel Bradley for 7000 stock bricks for Minor Canon Row, settled 1 June 1722 (DRc FTv/99/50)

Includes bill from Simon Lambe for repairs to the bells, etc., settled 7 May 1722 (DRc FTv/99/53)

Includes bill from Thomas Rawlings for digging a saw pit (saapeat), settled 10 May 1722 (DRc FTv/99/55)

Includes bill from John Kent for separating the stones of the wall that stood by the tower, settled 4 July 1722 (DRc FTv/99/56)

Includes certificate from William Peter, rector and John Wear (Wearr) and John Corne, churchwardens of Mawnan, Cornwall, as to James Downing of that parish, bedesman, being in perfect health, 26 June 1721 (DRc FTv/99/62)

Includes bill from Peter Athawes for 20,000 plain tiles, settled 8 September 1722 (DRc FTv/99/72)

Includes bill from Peter Athawes in respect of repairs by John Gamball, senior, deceased, in capacity as principal creditor and administrator, settled 11 April 1722 (DRc FTv/99/79)

Includes bill from John Pollard for 84 tons of sand for Minor Canon Row, settled 10 September 1722 (DRc FTv/99/81)

Includes bills from John Letchford [cf. Luxford] of Halling for 20,000 bricks, twice, for building Minor Canon Row, settled 1 June 1722 and 23 June 1722 (DRc FTv/99/84, 88)

Includes bill from John Hales for work by Peter Bland and John Kent, labourers, about the old wall, settled 16 June 1722 (DRc FTv/99/97)

Includes certificate from Richard Webb, clerk, of Deptford, as to death and burial in that parish of William Wadley, waterman [and bedesman?], 6 August 1717 (DRc FTv/99/98)

Includes bill from Joseph Golding for providing Raising Supper for Minor Canon Row, settled 22 October 1722 (DRc FTv/99/100)

Includes bill from John Martin of Snodland for 10,000 bricks for Minor Canon Row, settled 8 June 1722 (DRc FTv/99/105)

Includes bill from John Letchford [cf. Luxford, Loxford] of Halling for 43,000 bricks, settled 14 August 1722 (DRc FTv/99/106)

Includes receipt from James Hunter, vicar or Wateringbury for his pension of 4 nobles, 1 October 1722 (DRc FTv/99/107)

Includes bill from William Reeve for iron work to the bells, etc., settled 24 November 1721 (DRc FTv/99/110)

Includes bill from Robert Millar [cf. Miler, Miller] for 52 Newcastle flag stones, settled 5 November 1722 (DRc FTv/99/113)

Includes receipt from G. Walton [?] for payment for clothing Charles Harris, son of Dr. John Harris, late prebend, 23 May 1722 (DRc FTv/99/117)

Includes bill from Thomas Harwood for demolishing four stables and building three new ones, using the old materials (metarls), settled 28 July 1722 (DRc FTv/99/126)

Includes bill from Simon Lambe for mending the great clock, etc., settled 3 October 1722 (DRc FTv/99/129)

Includes bill from John Parr, pavier, for paving College Yard, settled 23 February 1721/1722 (DRc FTv/99/130)

Includes bill from John Letchford [cf. Luxford, Loxford] of Halling for 113,000 bricks for Minor Canon Row, settled 20 October 1722, with endorsement pertaining to discount allowed for quitrent payable on an estate sold to the dean and chapter in High Halstow, 1722 with duplicate (DRc FTv/99/132-133)

Includes bill from John Burgis [cf. Burges] for timber for Minor Canon Row, settled 4 July 1722 (DRc FTv/99/134)

File updated by Borough Archivist 27 April 2006


Date: 1717, 1721-1722
Quantity: 1 bundle or roll/135 items
Result number 10 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTv_063 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 02_DRc_FTv_Bills_and_vouchers_1552_to_1867/ DRc_FTv_063.html

Bills and vouchers 1552-1867 (DRc/FTv 1-231)

Treasurer's Vouchers, comprising beadsmen's receipts, receipts for payment of bishop's Xenium for visitation, bills for tradesmen’s work, bills for liturgical and sacramental supplies, bills for candles and tapers, bills for stationery, bills for giving of sermons, lists of quitrents and tenants, receipts for litigation and legal opinions, receipts for payments of tax, receipts for water supplies, parish clergy pension receipts, receipts for alms disbursed, receipts for apprenticeship agreements for children apprenticed out by the Dean and Chapter, receipts for officers' salaries and maintenance of children in the care of the cathedral.

Includes bill from John Hales for brickwork, timber and other materials at the minor canons' houses [cf. Minor Canon Row], settled 4 September 1724 (DRc/FTv 63/2-3);

Includes receipts from John Latchford and John Cable, bricklayer, for money towards building the minor canons' houses, 17 December 1723 (DRc/FTv 63/7-8);

Includes bill from Henry Hills for tiles for the minor canons' houses, settled 5 September 1724 (DRc/FTv 63/9);

Includes bill from Peter Athawes for tiles for the minor canons' houses, settled 8 May 1724 (DRc/FTv 63/10);

Includes bills from John Hales and William Martin for cleaving laths, gutter stone and steps for minor canons' houses, settled 4 September 1724 (DRc/FTv 63/11-12);

Includes bill from John Hales for 135 yards of paving in front of the minor canons' houses, settled 14 February 1723/1724 (DRc/FTv 63/15);

Includes receipt from Roger Pitchard for payment for lime for the minor canons' houses, 5 December 1724 (DRc/FTv 63/16);

Includes certificate from William Peter, minister and John Dingley and Robert Barnicote, churchwardens of Mawnan, Cornwall, that James Downing [almsman] of their parish is in perfect health, 5 October 1724 (DRc/FTv 63/20);

Includes bill for surveying Dean and Chapter's oak timber at Chatham, Strood and Marden bought by Master John Smith of Chatham, with survey, settled by Frederick Hill, 3 September 1724 (DRc/FTv 63/21);

Includes bill from John James for oil for bells, etc., settled 21 November 1724 (DRc/FTv 63/22);

Includes certificate from John Mackqueen [cf. Macqueen], minister and Stephen Hammond, churchwarden, of St. Mary's Church, Dover, as to appearance before them of William Wardell, almsman, 3 October 1724 (DRc/FTv 63/23)


Date: 1723-1724
Quantity: 1 bundle/23 items
Result number 11 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTv_085 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 02_DRc_FTv_Bills_and_vouchers_1552_to_1867/ DRc_FTv_085.html

Treasurer's bills and vouchers 1552-1867 (DRc/FTv 1-231)

Treasurer's Vouchers, comprising receipts for beadsmen's pensions in respect of Zebulon Clibborn, William Waddell (St. Mary's, Dover) and James Downing (Mawnan, Cornwall).


Date: 1735-1741
Quantity: 1 bundle/13 items
Result number 12 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/DRc_FTv_088 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Dean_and_Chapter_of_Rochester_Cathedral_1541_1994/ BB03_Financial_Records_1541_1919/ 02_DRc_FT_Treasurer_1548_to_1913/ 02_DRc_FTv_Bills_and_vouchers_1552_to_1867/ DRc_FTv_088.html

Treasurer's bills and vouchers 1552-1867 (DRc/FTv 1-231)

Treasurer's Vouchers, comprising beadsmen's receipts, receipts for payment of bishop's Xenium for visitation, bills for tradesmen’s work, bills for liturgical and sacramental supplies, bills for candles and tapers, bills for communion wine, bills for stationery, bills for giving of sermons, lists of quitrents and tenants, receipts for litigation and legal opinions, accounts of alms distributed, receipts for payments of Land Tax, receipts for water supplies, parish clergy pension receipts, receipts for alms disbursed, receipts for apprenticeship agreements for children apprenticed out by the Dean and Chapter, receipts for officers' salaries and maintenance of children (foundlings) in the care of the cathedral.

Includes receipt for two years rent paid by John James of several tenements and an orchard in Crow Lane, Rochester, formerly in possession of John Williamson, issued by John Denne, receiver 3 November 1741 (DRc FTv/88/2);

Includes certificate as to James Downing, bedesman, being in good health in their parish from William Peter, minister and Nicholas Bashley and Robert Stevens, churchwardens of Mawnan, Cornwall, 27 March 1741 (DRc FTv/88/11);

Includes bill from Ann Everest [cf. Everitt, Everet Everett, Everit] for keeping and schooling of Elizabeth Beamont [cf. Beament, Beaumont, Collidge] and expenses incurred when she had smallpox, settled 2 December 1740 and 30 June 1741 (DRc FTv/88/12);

Includes receipt from Ordo Shank, collector, for Land Tax on garden paid by Mr. Pocock [mutilated], 9 April 1741 (DRc FTv/88/14/1-2);

Includes bill from William Holmes, smith, for repairs to middle gate and chapter house chimney (chalmbely), etc., 12 January 1741/1742 (DRc FTv/88/16);

Includes bill from William Holmes, smith, for repairing the ball of a bell clapper, etc., settled 15 April 1741 (DRc FTv/88/17);

Includes estimate from Benjamin Joyce, plumber, for repairing the cathedral roof and steeple with annotation to effect soldering work ordered, 31 December 1740 (DRc FTv/88/20)


Date: 1740-1742
Quantity: 1 bundle/20 items
Result number 13 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/01_Intro on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/ 01_Intro.html

MEDWAY ARCHIVES AND LOCAL STUDIES CENTRE

DRc

RECORDS OF THE DEAN AND CHAPTER OF ROCHESTER c.1080-1964

Click here to view the full list of the Rochester Priory records or select the folder from the query tool by following the instructions given there.

These archives were deposited by the Dean and Chapter of Rochester in the Kent Archives Office [now Centre for Kentish Studies], County Hall, Maidstone, Kent in 1959, and were listed there by Miss Anne M. Oakley MA FSA between the years 1963-1970. The collection was transferred to Medway Archives Office on 27 April 1992 and the list prepared and edited for for CityArk Phase II by the City Archivist/Borough Archivist 1997-2001

Re-edited by Borough Archivist July 2000 (Priory introduction).

For a link to the Rochester Cathedral web site Click Here ......or here [two different sites appear to be in operation as at 3 July 2000]

Historical Introduction

The church of St. Andrew the Apostle, Rochester was founded by Ethelbert, King of Kent as a college for a small number of secular canons under Justus, Bishop of Rochester in AD 604. Very little is know about the history of this house. It never seems to have had much influence outside its own walls, and though it possessed considerable landed estates, seems to have been relatively small and poor. It also suffered at the hands of the Danes [cf. Denmark]. Bishops Justus, Romanus, Paulinus and Ithamar were all remarkable men, but after Bishop Putta's translation to Hereford [cf. Herefordshire] in AD 676, very little is heard of Rochester. Their bishop, Siweard is not mentioned as having been at the Battle of Hastings in Sussex with King Harold as were many of the Saxon bishops and abbots, and the house put up no opposition to King William I when he seized their lands and gave them to his lay brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, Normandy, France whom he had created Earl of Kent. The chroniclers say that the house was destitute and that when Siweard died in 1075 it was barely able to support the five canons on the establishment (1).

Four years after his conquest of England, King William I invited his friend Lanfranc, Prior of Caen, Normandy, France and a former monk of Bec in there to be his archbishop at Canterbury. Lanfranc's task was specific: to reorganise English monasticism on the pattern of Bec; to develop a strict cloistered monasticism but one of a kind that was not entirely cut off by physical barriers from the life of the rest of the church. He drew unsparingly on Bec for his ideas, his bishops and his monks. Four bishops of Rochester hailed from Bec, several priors and many monks. Among the bishops, by far the most important was Gundulf, his friend, pupil and chamberlain whom he brought over with him to England in 1070 (2).

(1) This account of the cathedral priory of St. Andrew the Apostle, Rochester is based on those in The Victoria County History of Kent II, pp. 121-125, E. Hasted, History of Kent II, pp. 22-25, F.F. Smith, History of Rochester pp. 273-335; W.H. St. John Hope The Architectural History of the Cathedral Church and Monastery of St Andrew at Rochester, Archaeologia Cantiana XXIII, pp. 194-328 and XXIV, pp 1-85; and H. Wharton, Anglia Sacra, I, pp. 329-394. Part of King Ethelbert's endowment included the land from the river Medway to the Eastgate of the City of Rochester on the south part and practically all the land on the south side of the High Street, all within the city walls. The priory property was extended on the same site in 1225 and again in 1344 making necessary the construction of new walls and ditches on both occasions. (See also DRc/T62, T280).

Siweard, Bishop of Rochester died in 1075 and to replace him Lanfranc brought over a monk from Bec, Arnost, as Bishop. He died within the year and at Lanfranc's instigation, King William I agreed to the appointment of Gundulf as bishop. This proved ultimately the turning point in the history of Rochester (3). King William showed no reluctance or lack of effort in assisting Lanfranc to recover the former properties of the church now that his relations with his lay brother had become strained and difficult and in 1076, therefore, Lanfranc successfully repossessed himself of a major part of the lands which had once belonged to St. Andrew's church at the great assembly held on Penenden Heath. Some of this property formed the principal re-endowment of the house in 1077 and was given by Lanfranc to Gundulf when he enthroned him as Bishop of Rochester in that year.

Edmund de Hadenham [cf. Haddenham, Buckinghamshire], the thirteenth century chronicler, says that Lanfranc made it a condition of his friend's establishment at Rochester that the canons should be replaced by monks, but as no other establishment was made until 1083, it would appear that Gundulf bided his time. No one knows now what really happened. There is a brief mention in the Textus Roffensis of one Aegelric, priest of Chatham and a former Canon of Rochester who made a gift to the new house to secure the honourable burial of his wife there, but not a word more.

In 1083 Lanfranc visited Rochester and himself instituted twenty two monks of the Benedictine order in the house, some from Bec (4), probably some from the two houses at Canterbury, Christchurch and St Augustine, and possibly some from Caen. He endowed the house with property making careful and distinct provision for the bishop and the monks. Some of the lands he gave them were his own, others he purchased, and some he had acquired in 1076. Gundulf also purchased and acquired a great deal of property for his house which rapidly found favour with the Norman kings. Together with Archbishop Lanfranc he began the rebuilding of the church and monastery buildings. In the rebuilding of his church, Gundulf followed the usual practice of starting his new building to the east of the existing church so that there would be no interruption in the services of the church. He also appears to have incorporated part of the City wall into his building as the tower known as Gundulf's tower was one of the watch towers (5). Substantial parts of his work remain today, particularly in the Crypt.

[(2) D. Knowles, The Monastic Order in England , 2nd ed. pp. 83-134
(3) There is an excellent translation of the Life of Gundulf by the nuns of St. Marys Abbey, West Malling 1968.
(4) Knowles op cit p.112

No distinction was made in the early years of the refoundation between the episcopal and prioral possessions. The reason for this was simply that there was no need for any such distinction. The bishop of Rochester was titular abbot of St Andrews and the prior was directly subject to him. At least until the first quarter of the twelfth century the Bishop actually lived in the house with the monks as one of the family (6). John of Seez was probably the first bishop to set up a separate establishment, but Bishop Gundulf himself made some division of the properties between himself and the monks before his death in 1108 (7). Until the thirteenth century, gifts were made to the bishop or to the bishop and the monks of St Andrew's Church, Rochester but very rarely to the prior although it is more than probable that the offer was in existence from the refoundation (8). During the thirteenth century benefactors addressed their charters to the prior by name and the monks of St Andrew's church, Rochester, or first to the prior and monks of that place. It was not [contd.]

(5) See DRc/emf77
(6) This was also true at Christchurch, Canterbury until Stephen Langton became archbishop. It was, in any case, the natural thing to do, and exactly what one would have expected of Gundulf who thought of himself primarily as a monk. Lanfranc himself explicitly equated the offers of bishop and abbot. Knowles op. cit. p.622.

(7) See DRc/T47 and DRc/T57/5, a charter of Gundulf confirmed by Theobald, Archbishop of Canterbury in 1145. It was not until about 1125 that the influence of the black monks ceased to predominate. The canonical organisation of chapters tended to separate the bishop from the monastery and to give the foreign to monastic life. Knowles op. cit, p.133.

(8) DRc/T47-59]

until about 1260 that the term prior and convent became at all common. The inspeximus of King Henry III is addressed to the prior and convent of Rochester and this was the first occasion on which a royal charter had been so addressed (9).

When Lanfranc established the house at Rochester under the ministry of Gundulf, he is said to have realised that difficulties would arise over communally held property and therefore made careful division between the bishop and the monks. At first sight, this might seem a good idea, but the greatest difficulty of all lay in the fact that most of Lanfranc's re-endowment was made up of properties which had belonged to the church before the conquest of 1066. Properties involved included the manor and churches of St. Margaret, Rochester, Stoke, Wouldham, Frindsbury, East Wickham, Halling, Trottiscliffe, Borstal, Snodland, Cuxton, Malling, Denton, Longfield, Darenth, Southfleet and Fawkham. They were given to the church by Saxon Kings and nobles, but they were entrusted to the bishop. In Lanfranc's time there was no difficulty, nor could he foresee any, for while the bishop was a monk and lived in harmony with his monks no difficulty would present itself. Gundulf may have foreseen difficulties. Before he died he made further provision for the monks. As well as considerable pensions, tithes and rents, he gave them the manors of Stoke, Wouldham, Frindsbury, Denton, Southfleet, Lambeth (Surrey) and Haddenham (Buckinghamshire) King Henry I confirmed all these and also his gifts of the churches of Wouldham, Dartford, Woolwich, Sutton at Hone, Wilmington, Chislehurst, Aylesford, St. Margaret, Rochester, St. Nicholas' altar in Rochester Cathedral, Rotherfield and Stourmouth; he added Boxley church and Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury added Norton church (10).

The house was wealthy, but when Ernulf of Bec died in 1124 it was the end of an era for the monks. King Henry I nominated John of Seez, Archdeacon of Canterbury to the vacant see and though they elected him as their bishop, the monks viewed him with suspicion. He was not a monk. During his short episcopate the prior became the effective head of the house. The bishop's duties changed and he became more a patron than a father, making occasional visits only and barely known to his monks.

[(9) DRc/T60
(10) DRc/T47-51]

He had his own household, separate from theirs and this separation of revenues and interests combined to make him and his successors a stranger to his monks and more often than not an opponent. The chronicler, Edmund de Hadenham [cf. Haddenham, Buckinghamshire] offers John of Seez no compliments. He says he made lavish gifts, began great things and did much good, but that it did not last (11). He took advantage of a great fire that ravaged the house in 1137, dispersed many of the monks to other houses, and stole from them the churches of Aylesford, Southfleet, Boxley, St. Margaret, Rochester and the altar of St. Nicholas in Rochester Cathedral, thus plunging the house into years of expensive litigation which ended only in 1144 when Pope Celistine decreed that the new bishop, Ascelin, should return them unconditionally to the monks to whom they rightfully belonged (12).

John's argument is obvious: The reason even more so. The revenues of the priory were far larger than those of the bishopric. On this occasion the monks were successful, but far more serious contentions broke out under Bishop Gilbert Glanville fifty years later which reverberated through the centuries.

Gilbert Glanville was Archdeacon of Lisieux in France. He was a great friend of Archbishop Baldwin of Canterbury and his successor there Archbishop Hubert Walter, and much in favour at court. He became Bishop of Rochester in 1184. His predecessor Waleran had proposed to seek papal permission to expel the monks from the cathedral, as he had a low opinion of the regular orders, but had died before he could implement the idea. Unfortunately for the monks, the plan was not uncountenanced by King Henry II who wished to cut the power of the regular orders, in so many ways exempt from the royal prerogative. Rochester, for instance, had the right to elect its own prior without royal interference, and had also enormous privileges within the City of Rochester. King Henry II therefore chose his friend Gilbert Glanville, together with Baldwin, Archbishop of Canterbury and Hugh Nonant, Bishop of Coventry to use Rochester as an experiment. They were to set up a college of secular canons who were not, in general, infected with principles dangerous to civil government, and who as friends of the national clergy, would form a powerful barrier against the encroachments of the roman pontiffs.

[(11) Wharton, op.cit., p.347
(12) DRc/L1]

Except at Coventry where force was used to set up a college of Vicars Choral, nothing came of the idea as the King's death put an end to all hopes of success, but disastrous failure though it was, it did nothing to ease relations between the bishop and his monks (13).

Gilbert Glanville remained in favour with the new king, Richard I and when he was captured in the Holy Land and later imprisoned in Germany, worked with a will to secure his release. His principal contribution was the establishment of the hospital of the New Work of St. Mary in Strood. This was a small house whose purpose was to pray for the restoration of Christianity in the Kingdom of Jerusalem and for the King's release from captivity, and to provide for the poor and travellers. It was a cause worthy of the monks' support, but without consulting them, the bishop appropriated two of their churches for the support of his new foundation, and further bribed their prior, Ralph de Ros, to give a piece of meadowland in Strood to the hospital in return for money to finish the stonework of the cathedral cloister and for a new pair of organs (14). Matters were made worse by the fact that the churches the bishop appropriated were Aylesford and St. Margaret, Rochester, only recently won back at great expense.

The monks complained. They petitioned the Pope to intervene and he did in fact do so, but to no purpose. The bishop forced the monks into an agreement to maintain the house as he had founded it together with the lands and churches he had given to it (15). The agreement remained more or less in force until 1239, then in 1256 the Pope declared that the churches should be returned to the monks. Gilbert was long since dead, buried in haste and deprived of the last rites, during the Interdict, but his successor refused to comply. The quarrel finally came to the test in the reign of Edward I when the monks were ambushed and beaten up by the monks at Strood while they were attempting to pass in procession through the hospital grounds (16). After this debate, the monks of Rochester gave up what was obviously an unequal struggle.

[(13) The History and Antiquities of Rochester and its Environs by John Denne, ed. by T. Fisher, 1817 pp. 112-115
(14) DRc/T572/1-15
(15) DRc/L3
(16) William Lambard, Perambulation of Kent , 1570 gives a spirited account of this incident, which, though he was violently anti-catholic, is most graphic. 1826 edition, pp. 328-331]

The Monks' quarrel with Gilbert Glanville stretched far beyond Strood Hospital to other problems which caused proportionate dissension: rights of presentation; the Bishop's xenium ; and the disposition of servants in the priory.

On the first problem, the Monks claimed rights of presentation to churches in their possession both within and outside the diocese of Rochester. In 1207 they possessed at least eleven within and seven outside the diocese, but they laid claim to others that belonged to the Bishop. On his part the Bishop made no claim to any. He merely stated that when John was Bishop he had never asked the Monks for authority. He had always presented and instituted incumbents to all vacant livings both inside and outside the diocese, but had secured to them their rightful pensions, which was all they were entitled to. Further Gilbert Glanville added that he proposed to do likewise, with the sole concession that those he instituted should do fealty to the Monks as well as himself (17). This was a meaningless concession. Although the Monks gave way on the Bishop's right of institution, they always denied that he had any right to present to priory livings inside the diocese. They did, however, reach agreement over presentations to livings outside the diocese of Rochester. The Bishop here claimed joint right of presentation with the Monks, and though they knew he had none, they allowed his claim; and as witness that they did so and kept their agreement at least in part, there is a document surviving among these archives showing the strictness with which it was adhered to in the cases of Norton, Boxley and Stourmouth in the diocese of Canterbury for over 150 years (18). The problem was not so much one of fees but of influence and authority. It emphasises the Bishop's ultimate authority over the priory and the Monks' refusal to accept it. Gilbert Glanville's interpretations of their charters were often wrong, but the Monks found that there was little they could do in defence of their rights.

[(17) DRc/L3
(18) DRc/L10]

The Disagreement over the Bishop's xenium is an interesting one. The income from the Bishop's estates was fairly small and the xenium was a recognised method of providing for hospitality at his table. The word itself signifies a gift made in token of hospitality. This was a particularly lavish one consisting of 16 suckling pigs, 30 geese, 300 hens, 1,000 lampreys, 1,000 eggs, four salmon and other items from each of the five principal priory manors of Frindsbury, Stoke, Wouldham, Denton and Southfleet, and further gifts of fish from Lambeth, Surrey and Haddenham, Buckinghamshire. It was Bishop Gundulf who had ordained in 1107 that the xenium should be given to the Bishop on St. Andrew's day (17 November) but with the important, and in this case, significant proviso that if the Bishop was away from Rochester on that day, it should be given to the poor (19). The Monks appear to have resented making the gift, and refused to bring it when the Bishop was away. They argued that it was an imposition and that it was contrary to the ordinance that the Bishop should have it if he were away. Gundulf had never imagined a time when the Bishop would not be present in his church at the patronal festival, and Gilbert Glanville argued in his defence that he was forced to travel and could not always arrange to be there. He, therefore, fiercely opposed the Monks and claimed the xenium as his right wherever he might be on that day (20). In the end the Monks were forced to surrender. This was a major victory for Bishop Gilbert and one of which he and his successors took full advantage. In 1329 the Monks accused Bishop Hamo de Hethe [cf. Hythe] of abusing the system. They claimed he ought by ancient custom to celebrate St. Andrew's day in the cathedral and in the hall adjoining and there receive a present of ten pounds from the prior and Chapter towards his expenses, but that each year he had received the present without performing the ceremony, had left the prior and Chapter to do it, and to pay for it as well (21). The Bishop's answer has not survived. Suffice to say that the xenium survived even the dissolution and was still being paid in the eighteenth century (22).

[(19) DRc/T47
(20) DRc/L3
(21) Registrum Hamonis Hethe Diocesis Roffensis A.D. 1319-1352 transcribed and edited by Charles Johnson, Oxford 1948, pp. 424-431 and Introduction.
(22) DRc/FTv34]

According to Edmund de Hadenham [cf. Haddenham, Buckinghamshire], Ascelin was the first Bishop of Rochester to interfere in the appointment of priory servants (23). When Bishop Gundulf had lived with the Monks there was one set of servants and officials to look after both the Bishop and the Monks, but after the fire of 1137 and the almost total destruction of the conventual buildings, the Bishop set up a separate household. The priory servants apparently joined him and the Monks appointed others. There were over twenty of these servants and officials, all essential to the smooth running of a Benedictine house and all equally indispensible. Their number included the master baker, the second baker, three other bakers, brewers, cooks, a steward, janitor, guestmaster, granger, infirmarer, tailors and launderers to name only a few. Each official's work was carefully laid down but more important than this, so also were his salary and perquisites (24). It was these perquisites, often free food and drink, which made these offices so popular. Many of the servants and officials were related to Monks in the priory. Nepotism was rife. It appears that Ascelin withdrew the priory servants for this reason but a visiting legate reproved him saying it was not his business to interfere. Ascelin relented and the legate attempted to improve matters by making the posts annual appointments rather than permanent ones, but to no purpose. The sons of master bakers still succeeded their fathers and one of them even found favour by marrying the cellarer's sister.

[(23) Wharton, op.cit., p.343
(24) Custumale Roffense ff.53-60.]

The legate Hinemar's suggestions did not solve the problem. The Monks were still complaining under Bishop Gilbert Glanville that he interfered too much in this sphere (25). Gilbert Glanville doubtless had many relatives he wished to provide for, but he cannot have had more than Bishop Hamo de Hethe who was one of the chief offenders on this score. When Simon de Meopham made his archiepiscopal visitation of the priory in 1329 the Monks made 25 complaints against their Bishop, four of which related to this problem. They complained that he appointed to twenty or more offices in the priory when he was entitled to only four or five; that he appointed his own kinsmen and others to priory offices who did their work by deputy and at half wages, too ill paid to be honest; that the officers and their deputies took no notice when reprimanded, and said that they like the Monks were irremovable; and specifically that he had appointed a brewer who was inefficient and of ill fame. Most of the charges against Hamo de Hethe [cf. Hythe] were dismissed but the Monks' claims were not unfounded on their first charge. The Bishop's family name was Noble and there are many appointments of persons of this name in his register (26).

[(25) DRc/L3
(26) Registrum Hamonis p.425 and Introduction]

Apart from their endless conflict with the Bishops in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, there were three other problems of conflict which affected the priory, all of them outside the walls: the position of the priory in relation to the Crown and the Castle; relations with the Citizens of Rochester; and relations with the archdiocese of Canterbury.

The first stone keep is said to have been built at Rochester for King William II by Bishop Gundulf for the then enormous sum of sixty pounds, in return for a gift of land in Haddenham, Buckinghamshire. The priory buildings lay in the shadow of the castle and suffered somewhat in the wars in which it featured. Kings did not, however, neglect the priory. Some visited it, and there is a series of charters of privileges to prove their interest and concern. Many charters repeat the fact that William Rufus was eternally grateful to the monks and their Bishop for supporting him when his uncle Odo, Bishop of Bayeux rebelled against him and besieged Rochester and its castle. The monks lost a good deal in the battle of 1088. Much of their house was destroyed but the Manor of Haddenham rectory, Buckinghamshire proved a lucrative present and, moreover, gave them a link with the past. It had belonged to the Countess Goda, sister of King Edward the Confessor, a fact which several charters also repeat (27)

. There were many skirmishes involving the castle over the years but no further sieges until 1216 when the priory was pillaged by King John and his followers. But the most spectacular siege and the one which the monks turned most to their advantage was that of 1264. In that year, says Rishanger, the Chronicler, Simon de Montfort and the rebel barons brought great siege engines and fire ships to Rochester and prosecuted the siege with great violence. Some of the priory buildings were very badly damaged and Simon and his soldiers broke in a carried off the priory monuments. The story is told on the back of one small deed (28). It tells how the charter and many others were stolen from the prior's chapel where they were kept and carried off to Winchester, and how John de Renham [Rainham], the prior got them back from the robbers but with the seals all broken and many of the charters torn and damaged. He was appalled at the danger in which this might place his house, and at great labour and personal expense persuaded King Henry III to reconfirm all the damaged charters by a new one (29). This the King did. The charter embodies most of the charters granted to the priory since the conquest by Kings, Archbishops, Bishops and other persons. And there is no doubt that this is in fact the charter concerned because, its content apart, there is attached to the seal strings another cord woven into it, to which is attached a small fragment of very heavily cross-stitched parchment, all that remains of the earlier charters.

A great many of the charters in the possession of the priory were damaged in this incident. Therefore to supply the deficiencies not remedied by the new Royal Charter, and also to circumvent some of the problems of the division of property between themselves and their Bishop, the monks resorted to forgery. This was not so much a crime as it is now. Rather, it was a necessity. Once forged documents had been used to prove title they acquired the force of the genuine article. It is of course unnecessary to remark that documents were conveniently lost and suppressed if their contents proved a nuisance.

[(27) DRc/T48, T60 (1), T65 (1)
(28) DRc/T53 and F.F. Smith, History of Rochester p.17
(29) DRc/T60]

There are at least two forged charters among these archives, both charters of Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, life long friend of Bishop Gundulf and a great benefactor to Rochester. The first charter refers to Northfleet Church which Anselm gave to the monks. The monks had the presentation but Hubert Walter and successive Archbishops attempted to wrest it from them. Probably in 1264 (or possibly before) the seal was lost from the document and to give it more force a new seal has been made from a cast. It is quite easy to spot. Firstly it has been attached upside down, and secondly there is a shallow depression in the middle of the figure of the Archbishop caused by an airbubble (30). This document is genuine enough. The second is not. It relates to the great quarrels with the Bishops over property. It has no seal and purports to be a charter of Anselm making over to the priory many churches and manors most of which belonged to the Bishop of Rochester (31). The handwriting very closely resembles that of the new charter of 1265 (32). It may even have been written by the same scribe. It has, however, one fault. The charter is dated 1101 by which year four at least of the twelve witnesses were dead and had been dead for several years before Anselm became Archbishop of Canterbury. There are five Bishops included among the witnesses: Maurice of London, Osmund of Salisbury (Wiltshire), Walkelin of Rochester, Stigand of Chichester (Sussex)and Herbert of Thetford (Norfolk). Only Maurice was alive in 1101. Herbert died in 1085, Stigand in 1087, Walkelin in 1098 and Osmund in 1099. Anselm became Archbishop in 1093.

[(30) DRc/T49
(31) DRc/T48
(32) DRc/T60]

There was constant disagreement between the monks and the people of the City of Rochester. The people had no parish church of their own and worshipped at the alter of St. Nicholas which stood before the rood screen in the nave of the Cathedral Church (33). The monks appear to have disliked this system since it brought them into close contact with the populace from whom they wished to remain apart; it disturbed their peace and meant that their church was not their own. Admittedly it was the common custom for the local people to worship in the nave of a monastic church and is the reason why many have survived as parish churches, but it was a sore bone of contention at Rochester. The Benedictine order had moved away from Gundulf's ideal of a monastic church not entirely cut off by physical barriers from the life of the rest of the church. They shut the doors at night and refused the sacrament to the sick; they denied services; and in 1327 they locked the doors of the nave and took away the key. The Bishop forced the monks to come to an agreement with the citizens and on 14 June 1327 it was accordingly agreed that the monks should build an oratory for the citizens in the corner of the nave near the north door with a door and window on the outside of the church for the sacrament for the sick during the night, to which the people should have free entry and exit. They were also guaranteed all the usual daily services (34). The Bishop was sympathetic to their cause and successive Bishops of Rochester tried hard to have a church built for the citizens, but it was not until almost a hundred years after this agreement that this became a reality and St. Nicholas' Church was built beside the Cathedral (35).

[(33) DRc/Emf 77
(34) DRc/L7
(35) Rochester Episcopal Register III, DRc/T60/ff.16v.-18v.

Relations with Canterbury were equally bad. Lanfranc's refoundation at Rochester was modelled on Canterbury. He appointed the first Bishop of Rochester, and the see was thereafter recognised as being in the free gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury. It was thus peculiarly dependent on Canterbury, and as a mark of this dependence, it was customary on the death of their Bishop for the monks of Rochester to take the deceased bishop's pastoral staff to Canterbury where it was laid on the alter in Christchurch Priory, and from where the newly elected Bishop took it after his consecration. Not all the Bishops of Rochester were consecrated at Canterbury. Arnost was consecrated at St. Paul's in London but his immediate successors Gundulf, Ralph and Ernulf at Canterbury. Ascelin also may have been; his successor Walter, brother of Archbishop Theobald, certainly was. It appears that the monks of Rochester objected not to the act of consecration by the Archbishop, or indeed that it took place at Canterbury, but to the claims of the prior of Christchurch that he represented the Church of Canterbury. This was a strange argument for the monks to put forward. They persistently and continually opposed their own diocesan and ought by right to have supported the claim of the prior of Christchurch.

Rivalry between the two houses grew, and in order to avoid the humiliating ceremony after the death of Bishop Waleran in 1183, the monks buried the Bishop's pastoral staff with him in the grave. The monks of Christchurch protested. The rights of the mother church, they declared, must be maintained at all costs and the episcopal staff delivered to the prior. Negotiations were begun. They dragged on for years and years, but for the moment a compromise was reached. The monks of Rochester agreed to deliver the staff, not to the prior but instead to the Archbishop who would deliver it for them. Gilbert Glanville was consecrated by Archbishop Baldwin in 1184 at Canterbury, and as usual in the absence of the Archbishop, took over the administration of his see while he was in the Holy Land. Benedict of Sawston was consecrated at Oxford - a belated attempt to escape from the overlordship of Canterbury; and later Lawrence of St. Martin, one of the King's clerks who became Bishop of Rochester in 1251 instituted litigation to try and secure some measure of independence for Rochester. This he did in the face of Royal disapproval, for both King Henry III and his Queen favoured the primate, and if the negotiations did not have the required results as far as independence was concerned, at least they improved relations between the Bishop and his monks (36).

[(36) DRc/L2, see Wharton, op.cit., pp.342-351; C.E. Woodruff and W. Danks, Memorials of Canterbury Cathedral p.104. Hasted, op.cit, 2nd ed.,IV, p.124 says the Archbishop did not interfere after 1238.]

It is exceedingly difficult to follow the trend of numbers of monks in the priory as the information available is somewhat inadequate. Archbishop Lanfranc introduced twenty-two monks into the house whom he instituted in 1083. When Bishop Gundulf died in March 1108 there were, according to Edmund de Hadenhem [cf. Haddenham] sixty monks some of the best read and the best singers in the Country (37). He also claims that numbers fell off after Gundulf's death but this may be accounted for by the fact that in accordance with the system of Bec, monks from well established houses were continually being sent out to help found and replenished other houses. It is known that monks went out from Rochester to the house of St. John at Colchester (Essex) founded by Eudo Dapifer in 1119/1120 (38) and to Christchurch, Canterbury in 1207 (39). There were apparently only 35 monks at Rochester in 1317; only 30 voted at the election of John de Sheppey as prior in 1333 (40) and these were doubtless drastically reduced by the pestilence which raged in Rochester between 1349-1352 (41). There are only 190 instances in the Rochester episcopal registers of monks entering the priory there for the period between 1320-1537 but this presupposes that all the monks in the house went through the various orders of the priesthood there. Obviously this was not the case and the registers of other bishoprics should be searched to determine an entry figure if this is possible. From the list compiled it would appear that there were far more candidates entering the priory between 1460-1537 than between 1320-1460. Twenty-three monks voted at the election of Lawrence Dan or Mereworth as prior in 1532 (42) and he and nineteen monks took the oath of supremacy on 10th June 1534. Only twelve monks received pensions in May 1541 but this number did not include those provided for under the secular establishment (43). From the figures given here, it would appear that there were normally about 30 monks at Rochester for most of the period of the existence of the priory.

[(37) Wharton, op.cit, p.337
(38) Archaeologia Cantiana XXIII, p.224
(39) Knowles, op.cit, p.365. There is also a case recorded in the Priors' Book concerning William Lecestre who was released from his oath of obedience to the prior of Rochester so that he could go to St. Giles Cornwall in the diocese of Coventry (Warwickshire) and Lichfield (Staffordshire) where Hugh Lempster was prior. This was in 1480. No reason is given for the transfer. DRc/Elb1A f.6
(40) Rochester Episcopal Register I, f.157. This was a disputed election: 22 monks led by the late prior John de Speldhurst voted for John de Sheppey, 5 led by Richard Bledlawe, the cellarer and his subcellarer Peter de Lambourne, for Willam de Reyersshe [Ryarsh] the sacrist; and 3 young monks for Robert de Suthflete [Southfleet].
(41) DRc/F1A
(42) Rochester Episcopal Register IV, f.73
(43) Calender of Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic. Henry VIII, Vol.XIV, 1540-1541, p.356 no.745, f.30 (November) and p.718 (May)]
When a man became a monk in a religious house, he discarded his own surname after his profession and was known instead by this Christian name and that of the place or parish from whence he came. For this reason it is a simple matter to determine the area from which monks came to Rochester priory. Most of them were local men from Rochester and its neighbouring parishes, some came from Canterbury, Folkestone, Dover, Hythe and Dartford; but as can be seen from the list compiled of the monks passing through the various orders of the priesthood, at lease nine came from London, several from Norfolk, three from Oxford, two from St. Albans (Hertfordshire) one from Ossory in Ireland, one from Winchester (Hampshire) and one from Mayfield in Sussex. The list has been compiled almost exclusively from the Rochester Episcopal registers.

In the early years the priors were probably Frenchmen: Ernulf came from Bec and Ralph from Caen, but as Rochester had the privilege of electing its priors without Royal interference, the tradition of electing a man from within the house itself developed very rapidly, and by the third quarter of the twelfth century this was probably standard practice. There was one exception to this rule. William Fresell who was elected in 1509 had previously been prior of Binham in Norfolk (44). After the migration of Alfred to Abingdon (Berkshire) between 1185-1189 none of the priors left to go to other houses. If they resigned their office, they remained in the house until their death. There are, of course, several exceptions: William de Hoo [St. Werburgh] who retired to Woburn in Bedfordshire; and those priors who resigned on their election to the bishopric, Thomas de Wouldham, Hamo de Hethe [Hythe] and John de Sheppey (45)

[(44) Rochester Episcopal Register IV, f.53. He took the following oath: In dei nomine Amen. Ego Willelmus Fressell Monachus expresse professus ordinis sancti Benedicti prior monasterii ecclesie vestre cathedralis sancti Andree Roffensis per provisionem et nominacionem vestras iuxta antiquas ordinaciones ecclesie vestre predicte prefectus sive nominatus promitto ad sancta dei evangelia vobis et successoribus vestris canonice intrandum et ministrandum vestris canonicam obedienciam Reverenciam et honorem necnon observanciam antiquarum ordinacium prefate ecclesie vestre cathedralis sicut me deus adiumet et sancta dei evangelia.

(45) Wharton, op.cit Successio Priorum, pp.392-399]

File updated by Borough Archivist, Medway Council 9 August 2001.
Date: n/a
Quantity: n/a


Result number 14 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/DRc_T066 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/ BA01_Foundation_Charters_Title_Deeds_and_Leases_c1090_1539/ 01_St_Andrews_Priory_Rochester_c1100_1526/ DRc_T066.html

Cathedral Priory of St. Andrew the Apostle, Rochester

Letters Patent of King Henry VII to the Prior and Convent of Rochester 1486 +

Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward IV 1472

A. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Henry III to the Prior and Convent of Rochester 1259

Quitclaim, on payment of one gold mark into the royal wardrobe at Canterbury, of all right and claim to the advowson of Hoo [St. Werburgh or Hundred] which Prior Simon [de Clyve/Cliffe] and convent of Rochester has obtained by exchange from the nuns of St. Suplice [de Rennes] in Britany, [France], and to which they had successfully defended their right against the king in his court.

The king at Canterbury [10] November 1259.**

+ This document does not appear to have been enrolled. From the hand and content it might be datable as either 1486 or 1510 as no indication is given as to which King Henry gave the Letters Patent.

** Part of the text has been damaged, but see C.P.R. King Henry III, volume V, P.62 from which the date has been supplied.

B. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward I to the Prior and Convent of Rochester 1275

1. Charter of King William [II] [1087 x 1100]*

2. Charter of King William [II] to ........** and all his ministers in Housak [c.1088 x 1094]***

Confirmation to St. Andrew's church, Rochester of land belonging to the reeve of Chatham which the monks have inclosed in their garden on condition that the monks sing masses, and that Bishop G[undulf] [i.e. Gundulf] gives other land of his own which is worth quarter of what the land was worth when the Bishop of Bayeux [Normandy, France] gave it to the monks.

Witnesses

Walkelin, Bishop [of Winchester]
Robert, Chancellor
Renulf, Chaplain

At Brigstoke [in Northamptonshire]

* Charters B1-3 are attributed to King William I in these letters patent. It may well be that B3 is a charter of King William I but B1 and 2 are certainly not. B1 is quoted in the inspeximus of King Henry III, 1265 as charter of King William II. B2 does not appear elsewhere but from internal evidence can be dated between about 1088 and 1094.

** Document damaged at this point.

*** Robert Bloet became Chancellor in about 1088 and remained in office until he was elevated to the see of Lincoln in 1094.

B.3.Charter King William I or II to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester [1066 x 1100]*

Order that the Church of St. Andrew in the City of Rochester shall have the customs which it had in the time of King Edward (the Confessor) in all its lands, annones and ports.

4. Charter of King William II [1087 x 1089]

5. Charter of King William II to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester [1087-1100]* *

Confirmation of St. Andrew's Church of the Church on the Royal Manor of Dartford which Robert, the King's Steward gave to the monks and which he and his son Hamo handed over to them in the King's presence.

Witnesses

Robert, Count of Mellent
Robert, Count of Montollio

6. Charter of King William II to the Bishop of Suffolk, the Sheriff and other Barons French [cf. France] and English [1087-1100]* *

Confirmation of St. Andrew's Church, Rochester of Roger Bigot's gift to St. Andrew's church of the Church of St. Felicity, Walton [in Felixstowe, Suffolk] with the tithes and all other things.

Witness

Eudo, the Steward at Winchester.

* King William I 1066-1087; King William II 1087-1100 ** King William II 1087-1100.

B.7 Charter of King Henry I [1123-1135]

8. Charter of King Henry I to Ansfrid, the Sheriff and other Barons French [cf. France] and English in Kent. [1128-1134]*

Gift to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester of Boxley Church with all its appurtenances in lands, tithes, oblations, rights, customs and liberties just as and better than ever Giffard, the King's Chaplain held it and Ansfrid the Clerk before that.

Witnesses

William [Corbois/Corbyl], Archbishop of Canterbury
Gilbert [Universalis], Bishop of London
Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln
Seifrid [Seffridus], Bishop of Chichester

At London

9. Charter of King Henry I to Archbishop A[nselm] [i.e. Anselm], Hamo, Sheriff and all other men of Kent and all Barons of England. [1100 x 1107]* *

Gift to Bishop Gundulf, the Church of St. Andrew and St. Paulinus, the Confessor and the monks of a two day fair in the City of Rochester on the eve and festival of St. Paulinus and all the issues therefrom inside and outside the City.

* Gilbert [Universalis], Bishop of London 1128-1134, a witness ** King Henry I 1100-1135; Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester died in 1107.

B.9 Witnesses

William Weyelimast
Eudo, the Steward
Hamo, the Steward
William Peverell
Hamo Peverel

10. Charter of King Henry I [1107 x 1109]

11. Charter of King Henry I to all his Barons and Officials [1100-1123]* *

Confirmation to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester of Soc and Sac toln and theam grithbrece hamsocne forstalles infangenethiof flemeneferme and other customs and liberties better than ever Christ Church, Canterbury held them in the times of the King, his father, the King, his brother and Archbishop Lanfranc.

The fourth penny from the toll of land and water in the City of Rochester, from the ferry when the bridge is broken, and from the whole hundred; and, saving the King's tax, one fourth part of the issues pertaining to the Constable of the City.

Witnesses

Robert [Bloet/Bluet], Bishop of Lincoln
Turc' de Guermon
Hamo, the Steward

At London

** King Henry I 1100-1135; Robert [Bloet/Bluet], Bishop of Lincoln died in 1123.

B.12 Charter of King Henry I to Hamo, the Steward and Hugh de Boch [1103-1107]*

Order forbidding any person to fish in the River Thames above the fishery of the monks of Rochester at Niwera. If any persons are found fishing there they shall be forfeit to the King.

Witness

Waldric, Chancellor at Westminster [Middlesex].

13. Charter of King Henry I to Archbishop A[nselm] [i.e. Anselm], Hamo, the Steward and all his Barons French [cf. France] and English in Kent. [1100-1107]* *

Confirmation to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester and Bishop Gundulf of Aylesford Church with the lands, tithes and other things; Sutton Church with all the tithes in annones, beasts, pasturage, mills and other things; Woolwich Church with all the tithes; half the Royal tithe of Strood and Chalk for the salvation of the souls of the King, his wife and his parents.

Witness

Eudo, the Steward at Rochester.

* Waldric became Chancellor in 1103 and remained in office until he was elevated to the see of Laon in 1107.
** King Henry I 1100-1135. The Charter is addressed to Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester and St. Andrew's Church [Rochester]. Gundulf died in 1107.

B14 Charter of King Henry I to Archbishop A[nselm] [i.e. Anselm], Hamo, the Steward and all his Barons French and English in Kent. [1100/1101]*

Confirmation to St. Andrew's Church, Rochester and Bishop Gundulf of Churches of Dartford and Aylesford with the Churches subject to them, and all the tithes of the vills where they are in annones, pasturage and money just as Saint Augustine held them in the time of his father; Milton Church with the tithes of the vill and the tithe of whales caught in the Bishopric of Rochester. Order that the said Saint, Bishop (Gundulf) and the monks shall have the Churches and tithes and hold them freely and quietly, and that no man shall harm them.

Witnesses

Richard [i.e. Rober Bloet/Bluet?], Bishop of Lincoln
William Giffard, Chancellor
Eudo, the Steward
Hamo, the Steward
William de Albinucio
William Pevrel of Dover

At Rochester 12 March.

* William Giffard was Chancellor to King William II and remained in office until about April 1101.

The King caused these writings to be exemplified under contd. his seal to minimise the danger to the Prior and Convent of Rochester for future time because the original documents were torn and their seals broken+.

Witness to the Letters Patent of King Edward I

Robert [Burnel], Bishop of Bath and Wells, Chancellor at Westminster [Middlesex] 10 November 1275.

C. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward I to the Prior and convent of Rochester 1275

1. Charter of King Stephen [1135 x 1154]

2. Charter of King Stephen to Ralph, son of Conus, the Sheriff of Kent and the justiciars and officials of Rochester to St. Andrew's church Rochester [1135-1139] ++

The Monks of St. Andrew's church, Rochester shall have their lands, tenures, and customs, and one fourth part of the rents of Rochester as well as ever they did in the time of King Henry on the day he died* and in the times of other Kings, his ancestors.

Witness

Robert, Chancellor at Rochester.

+ Nos igitur priori et monachis ecclesie predicte per rupturas scriptuarum predictarum seu sigillorum eis appensorum periculum minueat infuturum scriptures predictas sub sigillo nostro fecimus exemplari.

++ Robert le Poer, nephew of Robert le Poer, Bishop of Salisbury was Chancellor 1135-1139.

* in die qua fuit vivus et mortuus.

C.3 Charter of King Stephen to the King's officials in Merlana [1135-1154] **

Gift to the Bishop of Rochester of ½ virgate land in Merlana. No person shall harm him and if they do, the King's justice shall be done.

Witness

The Chancellor at Wallingford [in Berkshire].

4. Charter of KIng Henry II [1154-1189]

5. Charter of King Henry II [1174-1189]

6. Charter of King Richard I [1193]

7. Charter of King Richard I [1189-1194]

The same reason is given for the exemplification of these charters as under B.

Witness to the Letters Patent of Edward I

Robert [Burnel], Bishop of Bath and Wells, Chancellor at Westminster 10 November 1275.

D. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III to the Prior and convent of Rochester 1335

1. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Henry III 1265

a. Charter of King William II [1087-1089]

b. Charter of King Henry I [1123-1135]

c. Charter of King Henry I [1107-1109]

d. Charter of King Henry II [1174-1189]

** Stephen 1135-1154 e. Charter of King Richard I [1193]

f. Charter of King Richard I [1189-1194]

g. Charter of King Richard I 1197

D. Witnesses to the Letters Patent of King Edward III

J[ohn] [i.e. John de Stratford], Archbishop of Canterbury, Chancellor H[enry] [i.e. Henry de Burghersh], Bishop of Lincoln, Treasurer R[ichard] [i.e. Richard de Angarville, Aungervyle or de Bury], Bishop of Durham, John, Earl of Cornwall, the King's brother, John de Warenne [cf. Warinne], Earl of Surrey, Henry de Percy, Ralph de Nevill, Seneschal of the King's guesthouse

The King at Newcastle upon Tyne [Northumberland] 2 July 1335.

E. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III to the Prior and convent of Rochester 1335/6

1. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Henry III 1265

a. Charter of King William II [1087-1089]

b. Charter of King Henry I [1123-1135]

c. Charter of King Henry [1107-1109]

d. Charter of King Henry II [1174-1189]

e. Charter of King Henry II [1154-1189]

f. Charter of King Richard I [1193]

g. Charter of King Richard I [1189-1194]

h. Charter of King Richard I 1197

The Prior and convent of Rochester shall not be impeded in their enjoyment of the foregoing by reason of any non-user in the past.

Witnesses to the Letters Patent of King Edward III

J[ohn] [i. John de Stratford], Archbishop of Canterbury, Chancellor H[enry] [i.e. Henry de Burghersh], Bishop of Lincoln, Treasurer W[illiam] [i.e. William Ayremyn], Bishop of Norwich John, Earl of Cornwall, the King's brother John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, Richard, Earl of Arundel, Henry de Percy, William de Monte Acuto, Ralph de Nevill, Seneschal of the King's guesthouse

The King at Westminster [Middlesex] 16 March 1335/1336

F. Inspeximus of a charter of King Edward [I]+ to the Prior and convent of Rochester 1295

G. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III 1344

H. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III 1345

Special licence to the Prior and convent of Rochester to fortify and crenellate the wall of stone and chalk extending from the east gate of the city of Rochester to St. William's gate between the city and the garden belonging to the prior and convent, and to keep it crenellated without any interruption or impediment by the King, his heirs or their officials whatsoever forever.

The King at Westminster [Middlesex] 5 August 1345.

I. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III 1369

See DRc/T63 K. Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Edward III 1374

Special licence to Robert de Beleknappe, kt., notwithstanding the statute or mortmain, to give to the Prior and convent of Rochester his manor and Shawstead [cf. Sharsted] near.

+ This is given in the inspeximus as a charter of King Edward III but this cannot be the case as Anthony Bek/Beck, Bishop of Durham 1284-1311 appears as a witness.

Rochester, 23 acres land, 80 acres pasture and l acre wood in Chatham and Wouldham; and ½ the manor of Lidsing with its appurtenances, excepting 20 acres land on Shawstead manor held from the king as of the honour of Crevequore by military service, and 8 acres land on the same manor held from the King as of the honour of Leybourne.

Rent: 22 marks a year to be paid at Easter and Michaelmas in equal portions.

Conditions: 1. to find a monk to celebrate divine services every day in the cathedral church at Rochester according to an ordinance already made by Robert de Belcknappe

2. To do the due and customary services on behalf of Robert de Beleknappe [cf. Beleknap, Belknap, Belknappe, Belcknappe, Belkeneppe, Belkeneppe] and his heirs to the King, his heirs, and the chief lords of the fees for the manor of Shawstead and the land, pasture and wood, and half the manor of Lidsing [cf. Lydsing] forever.

The King at Eltham manor 28 December 1374.

L. Inspeximus of Letters patent of King Richard II 1393

Robert de Belknap, kt., deceased, by special licence obtained in this behalf from the King's grandfather, recently gave to Rochester priory the manor of Shawstead [cf. Sharsted] near Rochester with half the manor of Lidsing and other lands in Chatham and Wouldham, which, excepting 20 acres land on the manor of Shawstead as of the honour of Crevecoer, which honour the King's consort holds for life with reversion to the King and his heirs, and 8 acres land as of the honour of Leybourne, were being held from the Lord Edward, late King of England, the King's grandfather;

The residue of the same manor and of the other lands and tenements was being held from other persons as well as the king's grandfather. The monks were to pay the tent and abide by the conditions quoted under DRc/T66/1 K.

Afterwards Robert de Belknap, by special licence similarly obtained, released the priory from the payment of two out of 22 marks rent forever, and agreed to acquit and defend the property in respect of the king and any others lords of the fee.

Robert de Belknap was seized of this rent for 20 marks in demesne as of fee until, by forfeiture of the said Robert on pretext of a judgement against him in the king's court held at Westminster on the morrow of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the eleventh year of the king's reign (3 February 1387/1388), when the said rent of 20 marks and all the lands and tenements which belonged to Robert de Belknap were seized and forfeit into the king's hands.

After that the king, by his letters patent, gave the rent of 20 marks to John Scarle and his heirs; he subsequently gave it to William Kanenade, Thomas Chiche of Balverle, Thomas Brockhull, Stephen de Betenham, Stephen Paytewyn and William Every and the heirs of William Makenade. After the death of Thomas Chiche, Thomas Brockfull, Stephen de Batenham, Stephen Paytewyn and William Every released all their right to the rent to William Makenade and his heirs. Later William Makenade gave it to Gilbert Manfeld, citizen of London, Thomas Brockhull, Stephen de Betenham and Stephen Paytewyn for the life of William Makenade and with reversion to himself and his heirs as the king understands.

Special licence to William Makenade to concede that after his death the rent of 20 marks shall remain to Rochester priory for the maintenance of one monk to celebrate divine services in the priory, and for other divine services to be performed annually by the Prior and convent and their successors for the souls of William Makenade, his parents and friends, and all the faithful departed according to an ordinance made for this purpose by William Makenade forever.

Special licence to the Prior and convent of Rochester that after the death of William Makenade they may forever take and keep the rent of 20 marks and, notwithstanding the statute of mortmain, the manor of Shawstead [cf. Sharsted] excepting those things already excepted which are held from the same manor by the king's consort.

The king forbade that William Makenade and his heirs and the Prior and convent and their successors should by reason of these premises, by interrupted, annoyed or molested in any way by himself, his heirs, justiciars, escheators, sheriffs, bailiffs or other officials or their heirs whatsoever saving only to the king and his heirs and the chief lords of the fee the services due and customary.

The king at Canterbury 29 May 1393.

Inspeximus of Letters Patent of KIng Richard II

Restatement of the proceedings as far as the second paragraph of DRc/T66/1 L above.

Confirmation of Robert de Beleknap's release to the Prior and convent and their successors forever from the payment of 2 of the 22 marks a year rent which they pay him for the property they hold of him. Agreement to acquit and defend the property in respect of the chief lords of the fee.

Repeat of the last paragraph of DRc/T66/1 l.

The king at Westminster [Middlesex] 1 December 1382.

Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Richard II

With the assent of his Council, the king gave John Scarle a rent of 20 marks issuing out of the manor of Shawstead [cf. Sharsetd], half the manor of Lidsing [cf. Lydsing] and other lands and tenements in Chatham and Wouldham which belonged to Robert de Bealknap, kt. which he had and took from the Prior and convent of Rochester and which came into the king's hands by forfeit of the said Robert by virtue of a judgement against him in the last Parliament held at Westminster, Middlesex.

John Scarle and his assigns shall have the rent forever on payment of 200 marks at the receipt of the king's exchequer on terms which may be agreed between John Scarle and the treasurer.

So that if the annual rent of any part of it had to be recovered from John Scarle and his assigns by process of law without fraud of evil practice, the king wished that John Scarle, his heirs and assigns should be compensated by the king and his heirs to the value of the amount it happened to be necessary to recover.

The king at Westminster, Middlesex 5 August 1388.

Inspeximus of Letters Patent of King Richard II

Special licence to the Prior and convent of Rochester that they may acquire priories, manors, lands tenements, rents, services and knights fees with their appurtenances, advowsons of churches, both those which are being held for their own use as well as others, and other possessions of the abbies, priories and other foreign religious persons from the realm of France in the kingdom and in the king's hands by reason of the war between the English and the French [cf. France] or the schism of the French, or other lands, tenements, rents and advowsons of churches to the value of 100 marks a year for themselves and their successors forever.

The churches acquired from the possessions of aliens which are being held for their own use may be transferred in and to the Prior and convent of Rochester and their house as well as may be; otherwise the union or appropriation of those churches made to the abbots, priors or foreign religious persons shall be absolutely dissolved and they shall be newly appropriated, joined and incorporated to the Prior and convent of Rochester and their house for their own use forever to keep the king's obit after his death and the obit of Anne, late queen of England, decreased, each year, the statute of mortmain notwithstanding, or any other statute or ordinance to the contrary; and notwithstanding that the priories, manors, demesnes, lands, tenements, rents, services, fees, advowsons of churches and possessions of the aforesaid foreigners are in the king's hand by reason of the war of the schism of the French [cf. France], or are being held from the king in chief, or of the king's gift or by collation of his progenitors; and notwithstanding that they were given to the aforesaid abbots, priors or alien religious persons or their predecessors by the king's progenitors, to found or maintain chantries, hospitals, works of charity and for other purposes; notwithstanding any cause or material reason whatever which touches or may touch the king or his heirs in the future.

In the meantime, however, let it be ascertained by inquisitions taken in this behalf and returnable in the usual way into the king's chancery or his heirs' that the acquisition of these other lands, tenements, rents and advowsons may be effected without damage or prejudice to the king, his heirs or any other persons whatsoever.

The king at Margam Abbey (in Glamorganshire, Wales) 10 September 1394.

The inspeximus of King Edward IV was witnessed by the king at Westminster, Middlesex 12 November 1472.

The Letters Patent of King Henry VII were witnessed by the king at Westminster, Middlesex 19 April 1486.

There are no endorsements on this document but there are various hands and comments drawn or written in the margins of the first four of the five membranes drawing attention to particular points. This was probably done by Martin Cotes, Chapter Clerk 1547-1605.

At the base of the charter on the final membrane is written pro sex marcis solutis in Hanaperio and on the turned up edge
Examinatur per Johannem yong et ) clericos
Examinatur per Jacobum Whitstons ) clericos

The charter is also inscribed Whitstons indicating that he wrote it up.

The seal has gone but was originally attached to the document by means of a plait of green and white silk and two metal threads which is more or less entire. It extends 17 inches from the base of the document. The metal thread is of uneven width varying from 1-2 mm and has been would round a length of fine string before being plaited in.

The document is undecorated in any way although it was obviously intended that it should be as spaces have been left for the initial letter H and other letters along the top line. The word inspeximus has been enlarged at various points in the text for ease of finding the beginnings of the many charters inspected.

Latin.
Date: 1486 +
Quantity: 1 item


Result number 15 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/DRc_T155_1 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/ BA01_Foundation_Charters_Title_Deeds_and_Leases_c1090_1539/ 01_St_Andrews_Priory_Rochester_c1100_1526/ DRc_T155_1.html

Licence to alienate in mortmain 1338

King Edward III to John, son of Edmund Waryn of North Darenth:

Licence to alienate 10 acres land, 2 acres meadow, and 4 acres pasture in North Darenth to Rocheser priory in exchange for ll acres land in the suburbs of Rochester, and in Horsted in Chatham.

Witness Edward, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester at Kennington

Endorsements :
1. N.39
2.f
3. Carta de licencia Regis super excambie terre apud Derenthe [i.e. Darenth] [14th Century]
4. Anno 12 [14th Century]
5. "Septimans" [14th Century]

Large middle fragment of great seal of King Edward III in green wax. This differs greatly from his letter seal in that there is no canopy work, no shields and no allusion to France. The back-ground of the obverse is occupied by the three leopards of England arranged underneath one another on either side the seated figure of the King. In appearance it is very similar to the great seal of Edward I. See DRc/T185/1.

Latin.
Date: 8 October 1338
Quantity: 1 item


Result number 16 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/DRc_T155_2 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/ BA01_Foundation_Charters_Title_Deeds_and_Leases_c1090_1539/ 01_St_Andrews_Priory_Rochester_c1100_1526/ DRc_T155_2.html

Another copy of DRc/T155/1 (Licence to alienate in mortmain , Edward III to John, son of Edmund Waryn of North Darenth) 1338 Witness : same as for DRc/T155/1 (Witness Edward, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester at Kennington [Surrey?])

Endorsements : 1. Anno 12 [14th Century]
2. de excambio 10 acraram terre 2 acrarum prati 4 acrarum pasture in North derenth [i.e. Darenth] [14th Century]

Large middle fragment of great seal of King Edward III in white wax.

Latin
Date: 8 October 1338
Quantity: 1 item


Result number 17 - Please quote Reference: DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/DRc_L27_1 on request slip.

Path: Ecclesiastical_Regular_and_Capitular_Foundations/ DRc_Rochester_Priory_and_other_Religious_Houses_1080_1541/ BA04_Legal_Records_1096_1535/ 02_St_Mary_and_St_Nicholas_Priory_Leeds_1241_1535/ DRc_L27_1.html

Letter 1339

William Trussell, the King's eschaetor this side of the Trent quoting two royal mandates of [King] Edward III (1, 2 and 3 below) and his own mandate to the subescheator in Kent (DRc/L27/2).

1. [King] Edward III to William Trussell, eschaetor this side of the Trent:

He has pardoned Leeds priory for acquiring 1 acre land in Chatham in fee from Ralph atte Pette, ½ acre land in Chatham from Simon atte Pette, and 4 acre land in Rainham from John Elys in free alms contrary to the terms of the statute of Mortmain.

Witness:

Edward, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester, Regent of England at Berkhampstead [Hertfordshire], 24 April 1339.

2. [King] Edward III to William Trussell, eschaetor this side of the Trent:

He has pardoned Leeds priory for acquiring the following property from John de Evesham, clerk in free alms contrary to the terms of the statute of Mortmain:-

Messuage; 17 dayworks; ¼ daywork; 1½ dayworks and 12¼ dayworks arable land in Rainham' ½ acre land near Fermondesland, 3 virgates and 8 dayworks land in Rainham; messuage with the site and buildings which he brought from William de Woldham [cf. Wouldham], clerk, in Rainham; 6½ acres land with a house built on it in West Rainham (Westrenham); a watermill at West Rainham with marshland; 20 acres; 3 acres; 7 acres land with houses and trees; 3 acres; and 2 acres 5 dayworks land, all in Borden.

Witness:

Edward, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester, Regent of England at Berkhampstead [Hertfordshire], 24 April 1339.

3. [King] Edward III to William Trussell, eschaetor this side of the Trent:

Order to the eschaetor to allow the priory to hold 16 acres 6 virgates 6 dayworks land in Borden given them by Nicholas Blundel of Borden whose charter had been ratified by the King's grandfather, [King] Edward [I].

Witness:

Edward, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester, Regent of England at Berkhampstead [Hertfordshire], 20 May 1339.

Endorsements:

1. Chetham [i.e. Chatham], Renham [i.e. Rainham] , Borden . [14th century]
2. Chetham . [i.e. Chatham] [16th century]

Latin.
Date: 21 May 1339
Quantity: 1 membrane, sewn to DRc/L27/2


Result number 18 - Please quote Reference: P252_MILTON_NEXT_GRAVESEND_ST_PETER_AND_ST_PAUL_1558_1959/P252_1B_3 on request slip.

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St. Peter and St. Paul, Milton next Gravesend

Loose items removed from register of baptisms P252/1B/2 comprising letter from Rev. M.A. Daniell, The Missions to Seamen, Tilbury Docks, Tlibury, Essex, chaplain to Training Ship Cornwall to Rev. H. J. Powell, Rector of Milton next Gravesend, supplying list of boys baptised aboard TS Cornwall 17 May 1936 (1p.) and 25 April [?] (1p.)

 


Date: 1936 and c.1936
Quantity: 2pp.
Result number 19 - Please quote Reference: Medway_Council_1997_Date/EL_LEI_LIM_GM_01_01 on request slip.

Path: Local_Government_Authorities_1227_Date/ Medway_Council_1997_Date/ Education_and_Leisure/ Leisure_Division/ Libraries_Information_and_Museums_Service/ Guildhall_Museum_01/ EL_LEI_LIM_GM_01_01.html

Records transferred by the  Curator, Guildhall Museum, comprising in general manuscripts/printed items, originally mainly either donated to the museum or stemming from the former occupancy by the Rochester Town Clerk of the Guildhall pre-1974.

The following items were apparently mainly acquired by G Payne , curator of the Rochester City Museum, Eastgate, Rochester (predecessor of the Guildhall Museum, High Street, Rochester) but items 1/1/2-5 below seem to have been passed to Rochester Public Library, Northgate, Rochester (by whom labelled) and then returned to the museum at a later date, although all items may have the same provenance.family, domestic and estate accounts, possibly of Moses Hasted, pertaining to shares in cargo ships (named) and cargoes, estate at Mevagissey in Cornwall, law suits and business with named merchants in Plymouth, Devon, Newfoundland, Canada, Genoa, Italy, London and Amsterdam, Holland/Netherlands, etc. 1654-1659 (1 volume, folio) (museum/Rochester Library deposit G206) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/1);printed, annotated particulars of sale of estate of 178 acres in Cliffe leased to Richard Edmonds, and freehold and leasehold estate comprising manor and farm of Horsham with 1000 acres in Upchurch, Newington next Sittingbourne, Lower Halstow, Bobbing, Hartlip and Detling, auctioned by Mr. Dawson at the Crown Inn, High Street, Rochester 1812 (1 volume, quarto)(MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/2);[In the summary accessions descriptions of the following three guarded volumes, members of the Hasted family with same name as the famous Kent historian are differentiated as follows in order to avoid confusion:Edward Hasted Esq. who died in 1740 is referred to as of Lincoln's Inn and barrister at law;
Edward Hasted Esq. the historian who died in 1812 is described as senior;
and Rev. Edward Hasted who died after 1854 as junior.Care should be taken in consulting the contents pages in these guarded volumes, as they contain some inaccuracies. They were probably compiled by Edward Hasted junior.]guarded volume of Hasted family documents viz bond for due performance between Thomas Barling of Doddington, gentleman and Joseph Hasted of Chatham, gentleman, 1716;
statement or certificate by the ancient inhabitants of Newington next Sittingbourne attesting to existence of carriageway between land belonging to Joseph Hasted and the highway to Sittingbourne, 1730;
terrier and inventory of the parsonage and vicarage of Newington next Sittingbourne, 1615;
terrier of glebe lands belonging to parsonage of Upchurch, 1630;
feoffment, parties (i) Justinian Pagitt [cf. Paget] of Gray's Inn, Middlesex, Esq. and Thomas Bedford of Doctors Commons, London, gentleman (ii) Roger Jackson (Jacson) of St. Martin's in the Fields, Middlesex, gentleman, pertaining to the manor of Newington next Sittingbourne and constituent lands in Lower Halstow, Bicknor (Bucknor), Upchurch, Stockbury, Broadgate [?] (Brodgate), Borden, Rainham, Hartlip, Tong and Murston (Muston), consideration £490 5s, witnesses R. Johnson (Jonson), Robert Robinson, John Dyke and Aaron Kinton, 5 June 1680 (copy);
release of lease and release (lease missing) between Mary Browne of Stroud, Gloucestershire, spinster, trustee in will of Edmund Browne of Lincolns Inn, Middlesex, gentleman, deceased and Edward Hasted of Sutton at Hone, Esq. [senior], pertaining to messuage, tenement, gardens, orchards and lands at or near Newington next Sittingbourne, 7 June 1759 (copy);
view of frankpledge and presentments of the manor of West Cliffe, Henry Sheafe, steward, 17 October 1727;
printed item entitled a collection of statutes concerning Rochester Bridge printed by John Baskett of London, 1733 including lists of lands contributory to Rochester Bridge and parishes within 7 miles of same; inscribed Josiah [?] Oliver, Hollingbourne;
inventory of prints at Oriel College, Oxford, Oxfordshire, 1778;
letter from Smart and Buller [?], 56 Lincolns Inn Fields, London to Rev. E. Hasted of Hollingbourne [junior], concerning payment to estate of William Jeffreys, 5 January 1841 (with Penny Red stamp);
letter from unstated author to Edward Hasted of Corsham, Wiltshire, Esq. [senior], concerning estate matters, c.1812;
letter from Dr. Fairfax of Leeds Castle to Mr. Hasted concerning the former's indisposition, c.1800, pasted inside rear cover;
annual totals of Edward Hasted junior's expenses whilst an undergraduate at Oriel College, Oxford 1778-1783, pasted inside rear cover;
list of clothes, utensils, tableware and other domestic paraphernalia taken by Edward Hasted junior to oriel College, Oxford in 1778; (1 volume, folio)(MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/3);guarded volume of Hasted family documents viz deed of trust between (i) Edward Hasted of Precincts of Christ Church Canterbury, Esq. [senior], (ii) James Simmons and John Kirby of the City of Canterbury Printers and Co-partners and (iii) John Hinde of Milton next Sittingbourne, gentleman, pertaining to arrangements for printing and publishing The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent in Folio, 15 April 1780 (copy);
memorandum of agreement between Edward Hasted [of Eastling and barrister at law of Lincoln's Inn, London] and Robert Tyler, vicar, Richard Chrisfield [cf. Crisfield], Richard Sisell (churchwardens), John Keble, George Chrisfield (overseers), William Barrow and Henry Mercer [of the parish of Newington next Sittingbourne], concerning burial of remains of Joseph Hasted [formerly chief painter to the Royal Navy at HM Dockyard Chatham] in the [south] chancel of [Newington next Sittingbourne church], 10 June 1732 (copy);
letter from A. [?] Scobell of Farrington Gurney, Somerset to Joseph Oliver Esq., advising him of the death of John Septimius Hasted, 14 December 1853;
notes by Robert Cobb on the Hasted family burials in the chancel of Newington next Sittingbourne church, c.1820
notes on the death of Edward Hasted of Corsham, Wiltshire, Esq. [senior] 1812 and the disposal of his estates, c.1830;
account for funeral of George Hasted [of Lincoln's Inn, London], from Finch Hollingworth of Maidstone to Edward Hasted [senior] of Canterbury, Esq., 17 July 1787;
agreement between the parish of Newington next Sittingbourne and Edward Hasted [senior] of Sutton at Hone, Esq., granting latter right to build and use a family vault, witnessed by John Saunders, vicar, John Austen, Thomas Ady, John Fowle, Richard Murton, Richard Sears, William Tress, Henry Mercer and Henry Soan [cf. Soane], 23 May 1762;
bill from Thomas Gibbons, carpenter, to Edward Hasted [senior], Esq., for building a vault in Newington next Sittingbourne chancel, 1 January 1763;
receipt from Richard Chrisfield [cf. Crisfield], churchwarden of Newington next Sittingbourne, to Edward Hasted [of Eastling and barrister at law of Lincoln's Inn, London], for payment of burial fees for remains of Joseph Hasted, 9 September 1733;
account for expenses of Ann Archer's funeral, 1 April 1762;
bill for burial of a Mr. [George?] Hasted in a church, 9 April 1771;
transcription of monumental inscription pertaining to Katherine Hasted who died 10 March 1734/1735 aged 65;
accounts for work to the family vault including bills from John Boyse, Philip Fruchard and Thomas Ayling, 1762 (4 items); (1 volume, folio;) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/4)guarded volume of Hasted family documents viz armorial bookplates of John Septimius Hasted, Edward Hasted of Hollingbourne Court and Edward Hasted of Chatham c.1800 x c.1850;
probate copy of will of Katherine Hasted of Chatham, widow, proved 20 March 1734/1735, Prerogative Court of Canterbury (2 membranes with pendant wafer seal);
apprenticeship indenture of John Hasted son of Edward Hasted [senior] of Canterbury, Esq., to Thomas Fitzgerald of Deal, surgeon, 3 July 1783;
letter from Edward Hasted [senior] to William Child at Mr. Hasted's, Sutton at Hone, instructing him in making funeral arrangements for his sister, Ann Archer, and naming tenants to be involved, 26 March 1762;
letter from Ann Hasted of Canterbury to her brother Edward Hasted [junior] at [Oriel College,] Oxford, Oxfordshire, describing the events and aftermath of a recent hurricane including their father Edward Hasted [senior]'s losses in his estates and passing on family and local news, 5 January 1779;
draft codicil will of Edward Hasted [senior] formerly of St. George's Fields, Southwark, Surrey, now of Corsham, Wiltshire, Esq., 15 November 1810;
draft obituary notice for Edward Hasted [senior], Master of Lady Hungerford's Hospital, Corsham, Wiltshire, FRS and FSA, the Kentish historian, written by his son Rev. Edward Hasted [junior], vicar of Hollingbourne, 1812;
copy of instructions for his burial left by Edward Hasted [senior] with John Barlow Esq., 2 St. George's Place, Blackfriars Road, Southwark, Surrey, 1810;
draft or copy of will and codicils of John Septimius Hasted of Farrington Gurney, Somerset, gentleman, 1834, 1843, 1848;
draft will of Catharine Hasted of Hollingbourne, spinster, 1842;
copy of will of Rev. Edward Hasted, vicar of Hollingbourne with Hucking, 1854;
letter from Charles James of Farrington Gurney, Somerset to Josiah Oliver [of Hollingbourne], informing the latter of the precarious state of health of John Septimius Hasted, suffering from the dropsy, 18 November 1853;
[two letters from J.C. Burgoyne as noted in the contents page, not found]
cures and recipes for pleurisy, ague, fractures, equine diseases, to make old writings more legible, wasp stings, to give an edge to a razor, mange in dogs, to kill rats and to procure a miscarriage, etc., c.1800, attributed to Edward Hasted [senior]; (1 volume, folio) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/5).spectacles case formerly containing the spectacles worn by Edward Hasted senior (glasses not present), inscribed by John Septimius Hasted; c.1800 (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/6);notebook compiled by Edward Hasted junior as vicar of Hollingbourne and Hucking, recording details of collation and Tithe moneys received from parishioners and for Tithe Feasts, 1789-1791 (1 booklet) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/7);pencil oval portrait of Edward Hasted senior aged 69, 1801, possibly copied from another source, and inscribed, by John Septimius Hasted c.1850 [see Guildhall Museum negative KS4110] (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/8);key to Hasted family vault in Newington next Sittingbourne church c.1763 (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/9);copy of probate copy of will of Robert Halsted [cf. Hasted] of Rochester, haberdasher, proved at London 23 April 1649 [UFP] (1 item, paper) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/10);letters to Edward Hasted junior of Hollingbourne from John C. Burgoyne of 60 Wimpole Street, London concerning estate of John Septimius Hasted 1853-1854 (2 items, paper), Harry Grove of Staplehurst on social matters 1807 (1 item, paper), Daniel Stanton concerning Mrs. Long's charity 1858 (1 item, paper) and William Bedell of Dartford also on social matters 1793 (1 item paper), with various accounts c.1800 x c.1828 (4 items, paper); (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/11)expenses incurred by Edward Hasted junior as a student at Oxford and legal papers and accounts pertaining to estates c.1778-c.1811 (1 bundle) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/12);solicitors' bills pertaining to conveyancing 1792, 1825, bond between Edward Hasted junior and William Budgen, William Jefferys and John Gurr of Chatham, bankers 1822 [mutilated] and letter from Anne Foote of Malling Abbey to Edward Hasted junior c.1800; (1 bundle/4 items, paper) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/13);Edward Hasted junior's Kentish Companion and Almanack or diary, 1851 (1 booklet) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/14);Edward Hasted junior's Latin grammar notebook c.1778 (1 volume) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/15);letters received by Edward Hasted junior partly pertaining to litigation; also from his brother Francis Hasted and nephew Francis Hasted in Bengal, India and from East India House, London concerning the whereabouts of the same (Benares), and from others about other matters, c.1794-c.1832 (1 bundle) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/16);estate records of Edward Hasted senior mainly comprising rent rolls or annual tenants' accounts 1748-1784 with some papers pertaining to proceedings in the magistrates' court against Thomas Thornhill of Whitstable, baker 1787, Edward Hasted [senior] JP (1 bundle) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/17);copy of bond between Thomas Williams of Horton Kirby, gentleman and Edward Hasted [senior] formerly of Sutton at Hone, now of precincts of Canterbury, esq., 1790 and in-letters and accounts pertaining to rents and estates, c.1784-c.1803 (1 bundle) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/1/18).assignment of legacy for securing £537 19s 6d and interest, between Rev. Edward Hasted [junior] of Hollingbourne, clerk and William Budgen, William Jefferys and John Gurr of Chatham, bankers and co-partners, witnessed by Charles Hasted, William Nokes and William Parkin, 8 September 1815 (3 membranes) (MTC/EL/LEI/LIM/GM/1/19);[For a further item of possible Hasted provenance, see MTC_EL_LEI_LIM_GM_01_105]Accession no.: MTC/MR/89 [part]File updated by Borough Archivist, Medway Council 20 August 2001.


Date: 1654-1854
Quantity: 5 volumes
Result number 20 - Please quote Reference: Rochester_City_Council_1227_1974/RCA_TC1_12_21 on request slip.

Path: Local_Government_Authorities_1227_Date/ Rochester_City_Council_1227_1974/ 03_Town_Clerks_Dept_1863_1974/ TC1_Administrative_files_1863_1973/ TC1_12_Private_streets_works_1898_1932/ RCA_TC1_12_21.html

Private Street Works: Wyles Road, Cornwall Road

 Includes apportionment, cost of works, list of owners, Quarter Sessions documents

Date: 1929 - 1932
Quantity: 1 bundle
Result number 21 - Please quote Reference: Rochester_City_Council_1227_1974/RCA_L3_02_09 on request slip.

Path: Local_Government_Authorities_1227_Date/ Rochester_City_Council_1227_1974/ 08_LEGAL_1678_1974/ L3_Contracts_and_agreements_1812_1974/ L3_02_Contracts_relating_to_private_street_works_and_other_roads_improvements_1887_1975/ RCA_L3_02_09.html

Contract as to the execution of Private Street Works at Cornwall Road, Rochester 
Date: Feb 1930
Quantity: 1 document
Result number 22 - Please quote Reference: Strood_Rural_District_Council_1897_1974/SRDC_147 on request slip.

Path: Local_Government_Authorities_1227_Date/ Strood_Rural_District_Council_1897_1974/ 01_Clerks_Department_1897_1974/ 05_Highways_1936_1974/ 02_Public_Footpaths_1938_1974/ SRDC_147.html

Proposed Diversion of Footpath No. 40 Cliffe Station to Perry Hill, Cliffe

Correspondence with R.F. Wright, Perry Hill, Cliffe, R.W. Cornwall, Clerk to Cliffe Parish Council, "Arizona," Buttway Lane, Cliffe, G.T. Heckels, Clerk of KCC, Maidstone, W.J. Humphrey, Hon. County Footpath Secretary (Kent), Ramblers' Association, 25 Calmont Road, Bromley and others, discussing closure and diversion of above footpath.

Inc. facsimile maps.


Date: 1959-1961
Quantity: 1 file/c.50pp
Result number 23 - Please quote Reference: Strood_Rural_District_Council_1897_1974/SRDC_296 on request slip.

Path: Local_Government_Authorities_1227_Date/ Strood_Rural_District_Council_1897_1974/ 01_Clerks_Department_1897_1974/ 09_Council_Housing_and_Control_of_Private_Residential_Developments_1933_1974/ 03_Housing_Development_Schemes_and_Housing_for_Industry_1937_1974/ SRDC_296.html

Visit by [Dame Evelyn Sharp], Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Housing and Local Government [11 May 1960] (D/10/2)

Correspondence between Clerk and Peter Kirk MP, House of Commons, SW1, Selleck Nicholls and Co., Ltd., St. Austell, Cornwall, building contractors, Sir Neville Gass, chairman B.P., London EC2 numerous civil servants at Whitehall and others, making arrangements initially for Sir Keith Joseph MP, Parliamentary Secretary at the above ministry and subsequently his replacement, when called away on Parliamentary business, to visit two housing developments at Hoo St. Werburgh, for B.P. Grain Oil Refinery workers, and at Shorne for O.A.P.s

Inc guest list and programme.


Date: 1959-1960
Quantity: 1 file/c.100pp
Result number 24 - Please quote Reference: Strood_Rural_District_Council_1897_1974/SRDC_316 on request slip.

Path: Local_Government_Authorities_1227_Date/ Strood_Rural_District_Council_1897_1974/ 01_Clerks_Department_1897_1974/ 09_Council_Housing_and_Control_of_Private_Residential_Developments_1933_1974/ 03_Housing_Development_Schemes_and_Housing_for_Industry_1937_1974/ SRDC_316.html

Prefabricated Post-War Housing

Housing Sites, Grain : Anglo-Iranian Oil Co. (D/11/1, D/11/2)

Correspondence with senior staff of Anglo-Iranian Oil Company of Grain Halt, Grain and Frindsbury Circus London EC2, Ministry of Health, Tunbridge Wells, Selleck Nicholls and Company Limited, St. Austell Cornwall, Cornish Unit Housing Contractors, Newton Abbot RDC, Devon, Ministry of Local Government and Planning and others, discussing provision of housing for proposed oil refinery personnel in particular Cornish Unit Prefabricated housing as built by Newton Abbott RDC as above. With compulsory purchase order documentation.

Inc numerous facsimile maps, architectural drawings and site plans.

Inc illustrated booklet Cornish Unit Housing filed at September-October 1950.

Inc letter heading from Lionel L. Beevers, Manager, Carlyon Bay Hotel, St. Austell, Cornwall relating to proposed Strood RDC visit to Cornish Housing 31st October 1950.

Inc letters from Sir Richard Acland Bt. MP, House of Commons, London to A.E. Stroud, Clerk with related letters from Michael Stewart of War Office, London (to Acland) discussing release of War Department land for housing, 5/17 January 1951, 8 February 1951, 13/21 April 1951.


Date: 1948-1951
Quantity: 1 file/c.200 items
Result number 25 - Please quote Reference: Strood_Rural_District_Council_1897_1974/SRDC_317 on request slip.

Path: Local_Government_Authorities_1227_Date/ Strood_Rural_District_Council_1897_1974/ 01_Clerks_Department_1897_1974/ 09_Council_Housing_and_Control_of_Private_Residential_Developments_1933_1974/ 03_Housing_Development_Schemes_and_Housing_for_Industry_1937_1974/ SRDC_317.html

Post War Housing

Housing Sites - Grain (D/11/1)

Correspondence with W.L. Platts, Clerk to KCC, Maidstone, F.Parham Limited, Eva Road, Gillingham, Builders, District Valuer, 15 Star Hill, Rochester, public utility cos, Selleck Nicholls and Company Limited, East Hill, St. Austell, Cornwall, Ministry of Housing and Local Government, Tunbridge Wells, Anglo-Iranian Oil Company Limited, Grain, Kent Oil Refinery Limited, Grain and others, discussing development of new housing estates, police housing, electricity board sub-station, Bungalow Town and Mugeridge family, with copy legal documents etc.

Inc facsimile maps, plans and drawings.


Date: 1951-1953
Quantity: 1 file/c.250pp
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